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    Default confined space training

    I might be taking confined space training soon and I was wondering if anybody has taken it before. Is it hard?

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    My Dad is an instructor for it and I havent been through all of the classes, but in my experience it wasnt too bad.
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    I heard it had to do with things like grain silos and septic tanks. Has anybody heard similar.

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    Uhhhhhhhhhh ya.

    Wouldn't you think that those examples would constitute a confined space?

    Right from Wikipedia.....

    Confined space rescue is a subset of technical rescue operations that involves the rescue and recovery of victims trapped in a confined space or in a place only accessible through confined spaces, such as underground vaults, storage silos, storage tanks, or sewers.

    Confined space rescues can be technically challenging due to the environment in which they occur. Confined spaces are often narrow and constricting preventing easy access by rescuers. They are usually either unlit or poorly lit so rescuers must provide their own light source. Finally, confined spaces often contain hazardous materials in liquid or gas form which can be harmful or fatal to humans.

    These hazards can be fatal as they create a limited window in which to perform a rescue. The general rule is that after four minutes without oxygen, a person in a confined space will likely suffer asphyxia resulting in either brain damage or death.[1] The urgent need to rescue someone from a confined space often leads to ill-prepared rescue attempts. Two-thirds of all of deaths occurring in confined spaces are attributed to persons attempting to rescue someone else.[1]
    Technical Rescue Awareness Course. This should give you a little background info on Confined Space Rescue among other things......
    http://www.rescue1.org/trtaware.pdf

    Here is another link that might help with the training levels.....
    http://www.ifia.org/images/IFIA%20Lecture%201.ppt

    As you can see, Confined Space Rescue is a part of Technical Rescue as a whole and there are many other oppourtunities that present themselves.
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    It isn't anything you should be afraid of doing. It hits a lot of topics that are useful in the fire service: air monitoring (hazardous atmospheres), knot / rope work, ppe selection, mechanical advantage, and an intro to osha regs.

    The air monitoring will help you understand what your four gas monitor is telling you or noy telling you.

    The mechanical advantage can be helpful in extrication and moving heavy patients.

    Osha regs will help you get a decent side job once you get hired somewhere.

    The 40 hr confined space class along with the 24 hr Hazmat tech class are the building blocks for nearly every specialized / technical rescue class that you will ever take. Keep in mind many of the folks that teach these classes are career guys from nearby departments, so if you want to get hired there do your best to make a good impression.

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    There are various types of "confined spaces". A confined space is not designed or intended for human occupancy. It may have a restricted entrance or exit by way of location, size number. It can represent a risk for health and safety of anyone who enters, due its design, construction, location or atmosphere and or the materials or substances in it, the work activities being carried out in it, or the mechanical, process and safety hazards present.

    Confined spaces can be below or above ground. And be can be found in almost any workplace. A confined space, despite its name, is not always small. Examples include silos, vats, hoppers, utility vaults, tanks, sewers, pipes, access shafts, truck or rail tank cars, aircraft wings. Ditches and trenches may also be a confined space when access or egress is limited.
    Last edited by WaterbryVTfire; 12-31-2007 at 04:02 PM.
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    As long as you are not:

    a. Claustrophobic....

    b. Afraid of Heights....

    You will be fine. Confined space training is challenging and a lot of fun. The heights don't always come into play in basic level training, but working on top of a silo or a tank with no guardrails can be intimidating.

    There is a fair bit of general knowledge to go along with the course(s), and this is a huge hot button with OSHA, so be prepared to study and learn it to proficiency.

    This is one discipline that is often as fatal to the would-be rescuer as it is to the victim.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaterbryVTfire View Post
    There are various types of "confined spaces". A confined space is not designed or intended for human occupancy. It may have a restricted entrance or exit by way of location, size number. It can represent a risk for health and safety of anyone who enters, due its design, construction, location or atmosphere and or the materials or substances in it, the work activities being carried out in it, or the mechanical, process and safety hazards present.

    Confined spaces can be below or above ground. And be can be found in almost any workplace. A confined space, despite its name, is not always small. Examples include silos, vats, hoppers, utility vaults, tanks, sewers, pipes, access shafts, truck or rail tank cars, aircraft wings. Ditches and trenches may also be a confined space when access or egress is limited.
    Exactly... The definition of confined space I use is: a place not designed for human occupancy with limited means of ingress and egress.

    Basically the same thing that it says above, just a bit shorter. Confined space training is supposed to be a really cool class. If you like all of the technical resue stuff, try to get on the team if your department has one. Ropes I/II is supposed to be fun too. I've hung on a rope before (rappelling) and it was awesome!
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    Since this is posted in the junior/explorer section, how old are you? How are you taking a CSR course that is designed to put you in an IDLH environment in the first place? If you are truly interested in this, I would make one solid recommendation. Take your basic ropes first. If you jump into confined space first, you will be lost as far as the ropes go. Other than the air monitoring and knowledge of hazards, the rope component is the most important. Work at the technical rescue methodically. You will find that ropes is the best place to start for your foundation of skills. You will use ropes for almost every other type of rescue discipline there is in some way.
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    I'm not exactly a "confined space" kind of guy (if you know what I mean 6'4'', 230 pounds), but my department put me through it, and it wasnt hard. i was really suprized at how easy it was.

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