Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1

    Default Tandem Axle Rescues

    Is it just me or does there seem to be more rescue apparatus being specified with tandem axle configurations? I understand the concept that with a larger load there is a greater need for more weight distribution thus, more axles. I wouldn't imagine that rescue and HAZMAT companies are carrying that much more weight that just a few years ago.

    I was curious if anyone has any personal experience between the two different types and if one offered more stability and control than the other. I would assume tandem would make the load more stable but wasn't sure.

    Thanks,

    ICT


  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    31

    Default

    We recieved a new Spartan/Rescue 1 Heavy Rescue (http://www.station25.com/Rescue%2025.htm) this past May. We elected to go with a single rear axle because we felt that all of our equipment can be carried on a truck that size. We carry four hard-mounted and two portable extrication tools on board, a few hundred chocks, jackhammers, high-pressure airbags, airshores, confined space equipment, rappelling gear, more power tools than home depot. We carry everything we use in a smaller truck.

    Another company in town has a tandem-axle pierce rescue (http://www.station56.org/generic/index.asp?ptype=4). They do water rescue, which we don't. They also have a few other cool toys we lack (low pressure airbags, etc.).

    Ultimately, how many toys are you going to carry? Pick the truck based around that.

  3. #3
    Forum Member CooterRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Your First Due...
    Posts
    287

    Default

    IDK about anyone else, but around here we are ditching the full sized rescue and going with front line "rescue-engines". Ones with "coffin boxes", large bodies, maximized storage space and CAFS foams systems. Much like what FDNY does for their squads....

    Here's a few really good examples of rescue-engine's.

    http://www.fleetmastersinc.com/deliv...2007_squad.php

    http://www.fleetmastersinc.com/deliv...cue_pumper.php

    http://www.toyne.com/delivery.asp?na...veries&did=152
    "I don't wanna hear about it... I wanna see results!!!":-P

  4. #4
    Forum Member CooterRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Your First Due...
    Posts
    287

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gonzo25 View Post
    Another company in town has a tandem-axle pierce rescue (http://www.station56.org/generic/index.asp?ptype=4). They do water rescue, which we don't. They also have a few other cool toys we lack (low pressure airbags, etc.).

    Ultimately, how many toys are you going to carry? Pick the truck based around that.
    uhhh that's not a Pierce rescue... that's a Seagrave.
    "I don't wanna hear about it... I wanna see results!!!":-P

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CooterRob View Post
    IDK about anyone else, but around here we are ditching the full sized rescue and going with front line "rescue-engines". Ones with "coffin boxes", large bodies, maximized storage space and CAFS foams systems. Much like what FDNY does for their squads....

    Here's a few really good examples of rescue-engine's.

    http://www.fleetmastersinc.com/deliv...2007_squad.php

    http://www.fleetmastersinc.com/deliv...cue_pumper.php

    http://www.toyne.com/delivery.asp?na...veries&did=152

    Thanks. The first Seagrave I helped design and the second one is on the other side of town. We work together so we decided to put out truck together just about the same. We run 4 guys on a shift at our place and that is it. We rely on callback and automatic aid to help. We designed these to be an all aroud vehicle due to our staffing. I know some people don't like that concept, but that's what we found to work for us.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber jfTL41's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    573

    Default

    One advantage that I see with having the tandem rear is the shorter wheelbase. The wheel base being shortened makes for better turning and manuevering.
    The added braking is also a definite consideration.

  7. #7
    Forum Member CooterRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Your First Due...
    Posts
    287

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jfTL41 View Post
    One advantage that I see with having the tandem rear is the shorter wheelbase. The wheel base being shortened makes for better turning and maneuvering.
    The added braking is also a definite consideration.
    There's no such thing as better turning and maneuvering with a tandem axle. I'd be more inclined to say putting tandems on when ya don't need them per weight is a waste of money now and in the future. I'm a firm supporter in small short wheel base rescue (i.e. commercial chassis, or Ford F series truck) and front line rescue-engines. I guess to each their own, but with the 2 recent major roll overs in Maryland in the last week.... it has changed my view on large rescues.
    "I don't wanna hear about it... I wanna see results!!!":-P

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,219

    Default

    We have three F-series based rescues. They work great for EMS response and to haul manpower if they aren't built too heavy, but our F-550 squad that we run as our primary extrication unit is overweight, is absolutely packed full of stuff (we couldn't add more without taking something off), and overall just an ill-advised concept. I'd agree with your idea of a rescue-pumper, which I can hopefully push for our next engine. That way we can dump that POS mini squad, which I would bet if it isn't overweight, is RIGHT there at the max limit.

    The F-350 squad we run is ideal - it was cheap and it isn't beating itself to death because it is so heavy. If I could change one thing on it I'd add 4wd. We threw a four bottle cascade and fill station on it, which I like as well. If we need to send the thing out of district, we don't take all of our extrication/squad equipment with it.

    Keep in mind - we don't do extensive extrications, we don't carry TRT stuff, etc. - so I think a well laid out rescue pumper could fit our needs. Now the departments that have loads of equipment needs that have to go on that squad - that's probably a little tougher to try and stuff on a rescue pumper.
    Last edited by npfd801; 01-06-2008 at 10:50 PM.
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33

    Default

    I agree that tandem rear axles may not be needed for a rescue "toolbox" only unit as long as you watch your weight. But for rescue pumpers it can have its advantages.

    I have looked at numerous midship pump and rear-mounted pump rescue engines and most have been laid out great. Numerous cord reels, pre-connected tools, saws, gas powered tools, a generator and some cascade systems. Even coffin compartments up top.

    What I see is that every compartment is basically full. There is no room for expansion. Maybe in some other areas of the country units have dedicated functions that never vary, but some departments, like mine, without trucks depend on engines to carry truck/squad/rescue equipment.

    Since we plan on keeping new units for at least 15 years, where do we put the latest and greatest tools we just bought? We always seem to buy another "O" cutter or bag or rope or metal-cutting circular saw. Now, we need somewhere to put it. That is where weight and room come into play.

    And additional equipment may mean running your single -axle unit at it's gross GVW all of the time. This is where additional weight carrying capacity and another set of brakes can help out. The additional 5ft in length gives you the additional compartment space for expansion and can also allow for longer ladders if stored in the body or a larger water tank if your rescue truck may also have to perform as a pumper.

    We don't want to send our new rescue truck back to have another rear axle added because of weight issues - I have seen it done.

    Greater cramp angles that are now available (Spartan IFS on a 21.5K front end is 53 degrees) can make that longer tandem wheelbase quite manuverable.

    I am not saying you need a tandem rear, but there are some advantages.
    Last edited by dp7197r751; 01-07-2008 at 01:22 PM.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Rockford, Mn
    Posts
    146

    Post Rescues

    My dept took delivery of the apparatus below. We carry our back up extrication unit, cold water suits, medical gear, traffic signage, back boards, portable lights, ropes, and much more. The Sterling chassis has a tight enough turning radius it allows us to turn around in any of the cul de sacs in our city and it handles the rural areas very well too!

    http://www.customfire.com/d_specials...=430644b752ede

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CooterRob View Post
    uhhh that's not a Pierce rescue... that's a Seagrave.
    Brain fart, ya got me

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. tandem rescue
    By hcm1827 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-24-2005, 09:18 PM
  2. Tandem vs. single rear axles & Turning Radius
    By FFEMT545 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-06-2004, 11:29 AM
  3. Tandem axle tractors for tillered aerials
    By FEOBob in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-25-2001, 01:28 PM
  4. Mud, Snow, Tires, Tandem Axles and AWD
    By SBrooks in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-16-1999, 01:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts