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  1. #3701
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    Can't wait for part III, the truck co.

    I also need to get off my dead a** and get back to running, anyone want to go for a run around central park on tuesday? It's a hair over 6 miles, should be a good little run.
    Last edited by SleepyHollow; 03-07-2009 at 03:26 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aal2016 View Post
    Well now i gotta know, bro!
    Well, this is just an example but, say on monday i'll do about 500+ pull-ups, tues. about 1500+ push-ups, wed. i'll hit abs, thurs. i'll do legs (jumping exercises i remember from playing ball back in the day) and fri. i'll hit about 2000+ reps in different kinda dips or exercises using the dip bars. This 45-50 year old guy that's cut up like a action figure put me on to most of these exercises and i never been so sore in my life. The main reason why i did start this was because i couldn't afford the gym anymore (damn recession), so i ran around the park not far from my house which has an outdoor workout area and I just started working out with the gorilla's in the park. Kinda felt like i was in prison or something but i started seeing results.

    I don't get everything in every week, some weeks i'll miss one or two things but just from the other things alone i'll be tired and sore for a couple of days. I slacked off for alot of the winter but over the summer and fall months I was on my A game, now that spring is creeping up i'll get back to it.
    Last edited by I3akdraf; 03-07-2009 at 10:09 PM.

  3. #3703
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    Check out CrossFit (crossfit.com)

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    Quote Originally Posted by I3akdraf View Post
    Well, this is just an example but, say on monday i'll do about 500+ pull-ups, tues. about 1500+ push-ups, wed. i'll hit abs, thurs. i'll do legs (jumping exercises i remember from playing ball back in the day) and fri. i'll hit about 2000+ reps in different kinda dips or exercises using the dip bars. This 45-50 year old guy that's cut up like a action figure put me on to most of these exercises and i never been so sore in my life. The main reason why i did start this was because i couldn't afford the gym anymore (damn recession), so i ran around the park not far from my house which has an outdoor workout area and I just started working out with the gorilla's in the park. Kinda felt like i was in prison or something but i started seeing results.

    I don't get everything in every week, some weeks i'll miss one or two things but just from the other things alone i'll be tired and sore for a couple of days. I slacked off for alot of the winter but over the summer and fall months I was on my A game, now that spring is creeping up i'll get back to it.

    500 pull ups, are you ****tin me? how long does that take you? sets of 10?20? im impressed.

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    ditto on the crossfit comment above. One of the best ways to get conditioned. The traditional bodybuilding routines you see the useless muscleheads doing at the gym is horrible for functional strength and conditioning. Do stuff you would actually do in the real world, like different pulls, swings, etc, and do them with your FULL range of motion...your body adapts to the exact and specific stresses you place upon it.

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    Seriously. Are those full extension pullups?? I gotta admit man. I couldn't even come close to that.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by I3akdraf View Post
    Well, this is just an example but, say on monday i'll do about 500+ pull-ups, tues. about 1500+ push-ups, wed. i'll hit abs, thurs. i'll do legs (jumping exercises i remember from playing ball back in the day) and fri. i'll hit about 2000+ reps in different kinda dips or exercises using the dip bars. This 45-50 year old guy that's cut up like a action figure put me on to most of these exercises and i never been so sore in my life. The main reason why i did start this was because i couldn't afford the gym anymore (damn recession), so i ran around the park not far from my house which has an outdoor workout area and I just started working out with the gorilla's in the park. Kinda felt like i was in prison or something but i started seeing results.

    I don't get everything in every week, some weeks i'll miss one or two things but just from the other things alone i'll be tired and sore for a couple of days. I slacked off for alot of the winter but over the summer and fall months I was on my A game, now that spring is creeping up i'll get back to it.


    what!!!!omg man what are you training for the special olympics lol. I mean yea you would want to be in tip top shape but that sounds like supermans workout. Don't get me wrong thats incredible but Is that really necessary ???

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    It sounds like a load.

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    Is the FDNY getting any of that stimulus package?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaIrishScot View Post
    what!!!!omg man what are you training for the special olympics lol. I mean yea you would want to be in tip top shape but that sounds like supermans workout. Don't get me wrong thats incredible but Is that really necessary ???
    LMAO, I told ya'll its something thats hard to believe, but it gets addictive truthfully. But not all the pull-ups are full extension i do different variations of pull-ups and stuff in that hour and a half but in the end it comes up to around 500+. I usually do about 20-30 a set, some are kinda tough so i may only do 10-15. Some of the guys i workout with when it gets warm have some stuff on youtube. Here's the link of my man Hannibal, i'm not on his level but i'm not very far behind "www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfsTKfUT-RQ" just check this out and you'll see what I mean. The push-ups and the legs r the toughest though, it will make you sore for a week. If anybody wants to meet up on a Sunday or something to get it in, i'm game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by georgy2008 View Post
    Is the FDNY getting any of that stimulus package?
    Doubt it. I belive the only project in consideration was rebuilding a fdny facility located on a pier. Probably in manhattan for one of the marine units.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkylinePCG View Post
    It sounds like a load.
    Big time. Do you do anything but work out all day because I don't think even Crazy Pete can bang out 500 pullups a day!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by daBoogiedown View Post
    Okay, this job is the worst rumor mill you've ever seen or heard, but lets not start the rumors before you even get on.

    The city is NEVER 200 or 300 over on a tour. The worst I've seen is 150, give or take and even then, before the last class got out, there were tours every week that were under.
    This information came from a recent article in the Staten Island advance. Not trying to start any rumors. Page 181 for the full post. Maybe the numbers have shrank that quick since January 16th.

    Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta spoke about the temporary "reprieve" at a City Council Fire Committee hearing today. On any given tour, the FDNY has anywhere from 200 to 300 extra firefighters, so it would be possible to shift some manpower to Staten Island, as well as the other companies affected in Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx on a night-by-night basis.

    But because the FDNY won't be getting any new recruits this year, the department surplus will likely run out by the spring, Scoppetta warned.
    Last edited by Queens6019; 03-10-2009 at 12:26 AM.

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    To answer the question of how many 20 or more year Firefighters there are currently.
    "There's only about 450 Firefighters out of the 9,200 that have 20 or more years" this is from the UFOA President from this weeks chief. I will post this weeks chief articles later on tonight.

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    I3akdraf - that video is pretty sick, man.
    Just a peon proby in the greatest job in the world; grinning ear to ear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Queens6019 View Post
    To answer the question of how many 20 or more year Firefighters there are currently.
    "There's only about 450 Firefighters out of the 9,200 that have 20 or more years" this is from the UFOA President from this weeks chief. I will post this weeks chief articles later on tonight.


    And then there are a number of officers on the job with 20 or more no??? Or is that all together?? If anyone happens to know....

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    Quote Originally Posted by roadrunner09 View Post
    And then there are a number of officers on the job with 20 or more no??? Or is that all together?? If anyone happens to know....
    I would imagine so, Yes there are a number of junior officers on the job, but i'd imagine the vast majority of chiefs, captains, and a good number of Lou's have 20+

  18. #3718
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    Yes that was just the number of firefighters not officers.

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    Tragedy Leads to Slander

    To The Editor:

    No one encountered by FDNY firefighters is treated with more deference, courtesy and respect than a Lineof Duty widow, and this applies to Sherita Sears as much as anyone. It did not matter, nor should it, that her husband Jamel died while still a probie going through the Academy; she was treated just like all our other widows throughout his wake and funeral and was invited to and attended the graduation ceremony of her husband's class a month after his death.

    During that ceremony, the instructors who taught her husband as well as the firefighters who trained alongside of him honored her and her family. These instructors are now accused of causing her husband's death because of racism and even ordering his fellow probies to stand by and watch him die.

    This sounds like a blurb on the jacket of a cheap dime-store novel; I wish that's what it was. Incredibly, it sums up the basis of a recently announced real-life lawsuit filed by the widow, which I believe must be answered and opposed in the strongest possible manner (although my views are not necessarily those of the FDNY)—including defamation lawsuits filed by anyone harmed by these outrageous allegations.

    If we accept lawyer Ken Thompson's premise that Jamel Sears was the victim of an FDNY effort to keep blacks out of the department, then it's not only personnel assigned to the Academy who are in jeopardy. If Sears was recruited, they could not have subjected him to the "racially motivated" training if the Recruitment Unit and everyone involved with its creation and administration had not first enticed him into taking the test— surely they, too, would bear culpability.

    So might leaders of the Vulcan Society. After all, they were aware that the increased length of time spent in training was implemented in part to offset criticism when the number of college credits needed for employment was cut in half (or eliminated entirely if military or employment requirements were met) and that former Chief of Department Peter Hayden said that this was long a goal of the department.

    Capt. Paul Washington's complaint about the Academy being longer now than when he went through it would carry more weight had he taken a similar position earlier. He would also have more credibility in trying to downplay the importance of physical fitness and strength had he not, on numerous occasions, argued that the physical test was more important than the written and that it should be competitively marked instead of on a pass/fail basis. Vulcan Society President John Coombs has also stated in the past that firefighting is a physical job (and even that the written test should be discontinued). Seems to me a clever lawyer could make the case that these two are also vulnerable.

    Speaking of (not necessarily) clever lawyers: Mr. Thompson asks why certain training was implemented and then, without waiting for an answer, states, "We believe there was a racial motivation"—although everyone, not just blacks, had to go through it. He then admits that he doesn't even know what Sears was doing when he collapsed and, shockingly, declined to comment when notified that the autopsy determined a buildup of plaque in Sears' arteries was a contributing factor in his death.

    All concerned would also be wise to dismiss any advice coming from John Coombs. To claim that "we're not timed in fires" illustrates a dangerous ignorance and/or complete disregard of safety, as well as a lack of experience. Why does he think Chiefs pull firefighters out of burning buildings? Is he aware how quickly new construction fails in a fire? Or old buildings? Or that dispatchers constantly remind us how long we have been operating at a fire? How could they do that if they were not timing us?

    Frank Brannigan wrote, lectured and taught about firefighting for more than 60 years, and one of his maxims was, "There are no standoffs —either you are winning or the fire is." Of all the statements Coombs has made, the one about timing is probably the most disturbing—it's past time he knocked the chip off his shoulder and picked up a book on firefighting procedures.

    His statement that new, timed firefighting simulations were implemented to prompt a higher drop-out rate is as wrong as his other statements. The historical drop-out rate from the Academy is 10 percent; the rate for Sears' class was slightly below this.

    There has been speculation that the city might seek to reach a quick and quiet settlement to avoid bad publicity; this would be a mistake. Not only would it serve to confirm the infuriat- ing charges made (no matter what "legalese" might be used to deny culpability), it would also encourage future false complaints and lawsuits that turn the lives of innocent people upside down. I often commented that because of the extraordinary and expensive efforts made to achieve an "acceptable" racial mix of probies that it would be the instructors and administrators who would be put under the microscope during this class. I never in my wildest dreams (and I'm fairly pessimistic) envisioned a scenario in which they would be accused of murder, as Lieut. Michael Vindigni (Feb. 27 letter) so precisely pointed out.

    Jamel Sears' death was horrible and tragic, and I grieve for his family —but I advise anyone accused of the vile charges made to vigorously fight them to the end and demand, at the very least, a very public apology and retraction.

    PAUL D. MANNIX
    Deputy Chief, FDNY

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    Vote Against Fire Closings

    To The Editor:

    This is an election year with what apparently will be a tight and tough race for Mayor and other positions. Adding to the fact that Mayor Bloomberg changed the rules along the way without putting changing term limits to a public vote, even though it was enacted and kept in place in two referendums, he is now threatening to close not just the four firehouses subject to random night-time closures presently, but seven additional companies on July 1.

    We, the taxpayers and voters, deserve our essential services not be cut or even trimmed. Look to other areas and non-essential life-saving agencies to cut expenses.

    Our only way to let them know what we think of this is in the voting booths come November. If they start to believe or even fear their job is at stake, these politicians just may fight for us and keep our firehouses open. My message is this to all politicians: Vote for or with the Mayor to close fire companies and I will not vote for you.

    Strength is in numbers, so I hope everyone thinks this way. And remember, even if the firehouse closed is not in your neighborhood, it will still affect you.

    Lieut. MICHAEL J. VINDIGNI, FDNY Engine Co. 7

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    Calls Articles Misleading
    UFOA Pickets Post Over Disability Pension Pieces
    By ARI PAUL



    The Chief-Leader/Michel Friang

    ALL THE NEWS THE POST WON'T PRINT: Uniformed Fire Officers Association President Jack McDonnell hands out copies of an op-ed article he wrote as a response to stories in the New York Post about a rise in disability pensions among firefighters. Noting that the Post declined to publish his piece, Mr. McDonnell and other union officials urged city workers to boycott the paper.


    The Uniformed Fire Officers Association called on city workers last week to boycott the New York Post because of a series of articles pointing to a spike in the percentage of Fire Department retirees receiving disability pensions since 9/11.

    The tabloid showed that between 2004 and 2007, 72 percent of retiring firefighters left with a disability pension, compared to 62 percent in 2000. The article suggested that this was a drain of the city's dwindling resources, as disability pensions are equal to three-fourths of the average of a uniformed employee's final three years on the job, while a regular pension is one half of that figure.

    Bringing the News to Post

    UFOA officers and delegates handed out copies of an op-ed article written by President John J. McDonnell, which the Post had refused to run, outside the newspaper's headquarters on March 3 and outside City Hall the following day.

    A Post spokesman said in an e-mail: "It is our long-established policy not to publish dueling op-ed columns, and instead welcome responses and opposing viewpoints in the form of a letter to the editor. We invited the Uniformed Fire Officers Association to submit a letter but, unfortunately, have not yet received one."

    "There's a clear explanation," Mr. McDonnell said in an interview after handing out flyers. "After 9/11, there was obviously a year of recovery [of firefighter remains at the World Trade Center site] going on. During that period of time, thousands of members of the department were exposed to the toxins and the hazardous materials that were down there, and many of us came down with pulmonary illnesses. In an effort to try and identify them and to treat them, the department put many of these individuals— at one point, I think there were close to 800 members—on light duty."

    As he explained, these members stayed on light duty for nearly two years until the FDNY doctors realized that these members were not improving despite medical treatment, which is when the department approved retiring them with disability pensions.

    "This is where you see that spike," Mr. McDonnell explained, pointing to a Post graph showing that 65 percent of retirees in 2003 received disability pensions.

    He also noted that the Post graph showed that last year, only 186 firefighters were granted disability pensions, compared to at least 300 in every year since 2000, with a high of 641 in 2002, when by far the largest number of firefighter retirements occurred. This, the UFOA president said, signaled an end to the 9/11 disability pension spike.

    Cites Younger Force

    "I'll predict that it goes even lower than that," Mr. McDonnell said. "The reason being is that many of the individuals who have retired who have these illnesses, and what you're seeing is a younger population in the department. Over 70 percent of the Firefighters in the department have about five years' seniority. There's only about 450 Firefighters out of the 9,200 that have 20 or more years."

    He added, "Clearly you can see that this is starting to come down as a result of the department becoming younger and many of those individuals not having been exposed to the incidents of 9/11."

    Mr. McDonnell recalled that the Post and Daily News have attacked the pension of public employees before, and argued that the Post was painting the system as exorbitant in order to propel Mayor Bloomberg's push to require uniformed members to work 25 years and reach age 50 in order to qualify for a full pension. Those now on the job need only work 20 years to receive full pension benefits, immediately upon retirement.

    The union leader added that the Post quoted an anonymous city official insinuating that there was wrongdoing at the FDNY Pension Board, even though there are management and independent panel members as well as union representatives reviewing cases, often denying applications.

    "You . . . have to jump through hoops to be approved for a disability," Mr. McDonnell said.

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    Would Cut Contributions
    Governor: Tier 5 Pension Saves State, City $48B
    By RICHARD STEIER



    GOVERNOR PATERSON: Foresees big pension savings.

    The Tier 5 pension proposal announced by Governor Paterson earlier this year if implemented would save the city $16.3 billion over 30 years, and all state jurisdictions outside the five boroughs would save a combined $32.2 billion, according to a March 3 analysis by the Division of the Budget.

    The savings would be relatively small initially—the $200 million the Bloomberg administration estimates it could save next year has been questioned by union and legislative officials— but would grow "exponentially" according to the state analysis.

    Cuts Contribution 2.5%

    The Division of the Budget report stated that the Actuary for the New York State and Local Employees' Retirement System found that the state's pension contribution under Tier 5 would be 2.5 percent lower for those covered than for current employees, most of whom are members of Tier 4. The state Teachers' Retirement System said savings concerning its members would amount to about 3.4 percent of a Tier 5 member's salary.


    DIANE SAVINO: Better options for quick relief.

    The portion of the proposal put forward by the Governor at Mayor Bloomberg's request would cover all city workers, including cops and firefighters. Neither of those groups in other state jurisdictions is covered by the Governor's measure.

    Asked why that distinction was made, Division of the Budget spokesman Matt Anderson pointed out that the Mayor specifically requested that cops and firefighters—whose average pension costs significantly exceed those of most other city workers—be covered. Pressed on why State Police and local cops and firefighters outside the city were exempted, he merely said, "Our first goal is to provide savings for the state at a difficult time."

    Questions Short-Term Savings

    State Sen. Diane Savino, who chairs the Senate Committee on Civil Service and Pensions, has questioned the rationale for making major pension changes at this time, noting that significant savings will not result until there are sizable numbers of new employees hired for whom public employers will be able to make smaller pension contributions than they do for current workers.

    She reserved comment on the Budget Division analysis except to say, "We're going to have to look at it and study it."

    Ms. Savino acknowledged that despite her own doubts about the wisdom of such a change at this time, the fiscal problems of both the state and the city, combined with newspaper editorials supporting the Mayor's call for reduced pension costs, have made it a key element in the debate on a state budget that is due April 1.

    "The pressure continues to be on," she said. "You can't cut here and cut there without taking a look at this."

    Wouldn't Pay for OT

    One of the prime elements of Tier 5 savings would be the elimination of overtime compensation when calculating employees' retirement allowances. Many of the others, the Budget Division analysis notes, would repeal key pension gains made by public workers a decade ago, when the earnings of both the city and state pension funds were robust enough to improve benefits while at the same time reducing employer contributions.

    Among them is the restoration of the minimum retirement age—which for most employees is now 55 or 57—to 62. In the case of city cops and firefighters, who now qualify for full pensions after 20 years' service at any age, the proposal would make the service requirement for future hires 25 years and they would have to be at least 50 to collect.

    The Governor's proposal would also require employees to once again contribute to their pensions for the length of their careers rather than ceasing to pay into the system after 10 years of service. And employees would need at least 10 years on the job to qualify for a pension; the current minimum is five.

    Big Gap on City, State Savings

    The Budget Division's own calculations raise questions about the city's claim that it could save $200 million in the municipal fiscal year that begins July 1 if Tier 5 were enacted. They estimate that the lesser pensions would reduce the state's costs over the next 30 years by $7.5 billion, slightly less than half of what the city expects to save during that period.

    Yet in the first year of the new plan, the Budget Division projects that the state would save just $4.5 million, and after three years it estimates cumulative savings would total $59.4 million— just 30 percent of what the city has said it would reap in the first year alone.

    Mayoral spokesman Jason Post said, however, that there were some significant differences between the state and city Tier 5 plans that accounted for the wide gap in savings early on. The primary one, he indicated in an e-mail, is that the state Tier 5 plan would not include cops and firefighters.

    He explained that the pension liability created by the hiring of any new employee is funded over the entire course of his or her service. "If the minimum length of service for retirement is extended for five years, the working lifetime increases and the pension liabilities can be funded over a longer period of time," he stated.

    Greater Drug-Plan Savings

    Since the state would not reap the savings that the city would accrue for those two sizable employee groups, he continued, "the city pension savings are proportionately larger in the early years."

    Senator Savino contended, however, that the city could realize far greater savings by taking over all the municipal unions' prescription drug plans. There would be major savings from needing fewer employees to administer the plans if they were consolidated, and the city's considerably greater buying power on behalf of hundreds of thousands of workers and retirees would produce significant discounts from providers, she said she told Mr. Bloomberg in a recent conversation.

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    By CHUCK BENNETT


    Last updated: 1:58 am
    March 9, 2009
    Posted: 1:57 am
    March 9, 2009

    So-called "Christmas bonuses" given to NYPD and FDNY retirees as pension "sweeteners" topped $450 million last year and are poised to be an extra-sour burden on recession-shocked city coffers.

    Deft bargaining by union officials 40 years ago won their retirees a share of the returns of their pension funds' investments - and in a later amendment to the deal, the unions masterfully negotiated a fixed-cash payment whether the funds experienced a boom or bust.

    Last year, the individual checks, referred to by retirees as the "Christmas bonus" because they're mailed out on Dec. 15, amounted to $12,000 each - free of city and state tax - or $455 million in total. About 80 percent went to retired cops and 20 percent to firefighters.

    In fiscal year 2009 - which begins July 1 - the city will be on the hook for $550 million, and by 2010, the city is anticipating it will have to pay $600 million to make up for the pension funds' huge investment losses.

    Now, amid the recession, Mayor Bloomberg wants to scrap the bonuses entirely for new hires. It's just one part of his wide-ranging pension-reform plan, which he hopes will end the "20 and out" - as in years - retirement package for uniformed workers while raising their contributions to pension funds and health care.

    "The city can no longer afford the generous pension packages that were designed in a different era," said Bloomberg spokesman Marc LaVorgna.

    Charles Brecher, research director for the Citizens Budget Commission, which supports Bloomberg's efforts, said, "In the end, the taxpayers are paying for it."

    Officially known as the Variable Supplement Funds, the system that pays the "Christmas bonus" is the product of a deal between the city and the unions that went into effect in 1970.

    That deal allowed the pension fund to expand its investments beyond bonds in the hope that this would reduce direct contributions from the city.

    The police and firefighter unions said if their pension funds would engage in riskier, and potentially more lucrative, investments, the members should get a share.

    "The Variable Supplement Fund has long been self-funded and still is today. It does not cost the city a dime," said PBA President Patrick Lynch.

    "In any honest comparison of police pension benefits, New York City's police benefits are barely average in the law-enforcement market. They are not the source of the city fiscal problems and should not be looked to as the solution," he added.

    And over the decades, as the stock market surged, the success of the Variable Supplement Fund indeed saved the city countless millions in contributions to police and firefighter pensions. The city even borrowed $177 million from the fund in the 1980s and early 1990s.

    The two largest Variable Supplement Funds for retired police officers and superior officers had a collective $2 billion as of last June, but the city expects those funds to drop by 30 percent. Any change to the funds would require action by the governor and state Legislature, which could be a very tough fight.

    chuck.bennett@nypost.com

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    Some more retirements and future retirements http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/insider...up_15_2009.pdf

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    Everytime I see an ad for rescue me I want to puke.... or jump off the triboro. Or puke while jumping off the triboro. Wait scratch that.... It's the RFK. Sorry.

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