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  1. #5401
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    Quote Originally Posted by aal2016 View Post
    Also, does anyone know if race-based quota hiring has been proven unconstitutional?

    I heard this somewhere. If so, NY will probably not go this way, as it would make them vulnerable to more lawsuits.
    LA city, Boston and I believe chicago had quotas that were later deemed unconstitutional. Philly still has one, they have to hire 12% minorities in every recruit class.

    When someone (read: white guys) eventually appeals these decisions, at somewhere up the appeals ladder it is generally agreed upon that not being hired because you are white is "discrimination". Who knew.


    Resist Firefighter Quotas

    To The Editor:

    On March 19 lawyers with the Center for Constitutional Rights, acting on behalf of the FDNY Vulcan Society, moved for summary judgment in the Justice Department lawsuit against the city's hiring practices. One of the Vulcans' complaints is that while blacks and Latinos comprise 10 percent of the FDNY, the departments in Boston, Los Angeles and Philadelphia are 40-50 percent minority. Let us take a look at how that came to be.

    Boston operated under a consent decree mandating quota hiring from 1974-2003. While in force the decree required that one minority had to be hired for every white person, and was only ended because of a lawsuit brought by whites who did not think they should be discriminated against because of their race.

    Los Angeles operated under a consent decree mandating quota hiring from 1974-2002. While in force, the number of white applicants allowed to even take the entry test was capped at 50 percent of the total ( so if 30,000 minorities and 50,000 whites applied, 20,000 whites would have their applications voided or thrown out). This, too, was only ended because a group of whites insisted on equal treatment via the courts.

    What of the City of Brotherly Love? Philadelphia got a little bit of a late start with its quota (1977) so maybe that's why it was extended indefinitely in 1999 and is still in force to this day.

    On the CCR Web site the departments in Baltimore (30 percent black) and Chicago (23 percent black) are also lauded for their minority representation; how did these cities do it? Well, Baltimore at one point removed all physical fitness requirements from the selection criteria in order to recruit a diversified work force and utilized self-elimination as the only means of screening candidates. They did re-introduce fitness standards last December but, sadly, it took the death of a female recruit during training to force this change.

    Chicago? You guessed it—a 1980 court order mandated increased minority employment at all levels; there was even a provision stipulating that 45 percent of all ranks should be minority.

    There are many, I know, who read this and think, "Good! That's how New York City should be forced to do it." These people either don't know what firefighting entails or don't care —which is far worse.

    Vulcan lawyer Anjana Samant can state in a March 27 article in The Chief "we really want the city to… come with an exam that is actually going to [produce] the best potential Firefighter from the applicant pool" but she is either lying or has missed the memo from Vulcan leaders.

    Vulcan President John Coombs, in the same article, is presented with evidence of increased minority hiring following the January 2007 entry test (which was an abomination, but I'll leave further analysis of it for another time). His answer? "Until all those people are hired, they really can't say how successful they are. We're still waiting for the end product." Coombs will accept nothing less than quota hiring.

    Former Vulcan leader Paul Washington is more direct in his demand for quotas. He has said that the goal of the current lawsuit is to set hiring goals that will benefit black candidates and that "if they set numerical goals, the Vulcan Society would be all for that." Discussing the 1970s Federal court order that required the FDNY to hire one black for every three other candidates Washington said, "That was good then, and we'd love to see that return even higher. We are not averse to the most radical of methods. If that's what has to happen, that's fine with us."

    If he were a civilian who did not fully understand the dangers we face I could simply dismiss him as ignorant, but since he is an FDNY Captain with 20 years on the job, I can't. What, then, is it that would motivate him to make such statements? Can he be that incredibly reckless? Or selfish? Is he playing games with people's lives as a springboard to a political career?

    Whatever the reason, he, the Vulcan leadership and the Justice Department have displayed an inexcusable disregard for the safety of firefighters and civilians. Quotas are racist, demoralizing, dangerous and engender resentment of those they benefit, as well as cast doubt on the accomplishments of those they purport to help. Everyone has an equal opportunity—key word opportunity —to become whatever they would like to become. I believe that no one should be hired based on race, and no one should expect a guaranteed result (although my opinions are not necessarily those of the FDNY).
    PAUL D. MANNIX
    Deputy Chief, FDNY
    Last edited by SleepyHollow; 12-11-2009 at 04:15 AM.
    I should have cleaned up the chili.....why didn't I clean up the chili!!!!!!

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    Gal Is In Running for FDNY Commish
    NY Post - December 11, 2009

    by PHILIP MESSING



    A woman is on the brink of crashing the famously "all boys club" FDNY, clawing her way to the top of a short list of contenders to succeed retiring Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta, The Post has learned.
    Lawyer Mylan L. Denerstein, the executive director for social justice in Attorney General Andrew Cuomo's office, has already been interviewed by City Hall and is under serious consideration for the top spot, multiple sources say.

    "She is definitely a leading contender," said an official familiar with the inner workings of the FDNY.

    Denerstein, who has never been a firefighter, would be the first woman to run the department in its 110-year history -- and just the 33rd on the current payroll of 11,300.

    That number has declined since a high of 40 in 1982.

    A graduate of the University of Virginia and Columbia Law School, Denerstein was formerly the top lawyer for the FDNY, having served as the agency's deputy fire commissioner of legal affairs from 2003 through 2006.

    "She is remarkable. She would be a brilliant fire commissioner," said Susan Butler Plum, a longtime friend and director of the prestigious Skadden Fellowship Program, which in 1994 awarded Denerstein an academic stipend.

    "She's very smart. She thinks before she speaks. She's very analytical, composed. Hugely, broadly experienced. She's . . . one of our stars."

    As an African-American, Denerstein's appointment could also help combat the FDNY's racial issues -- highlighted in July when a Brooklyn federal judge green-lighted a civil-rights lawsuit filed by the Vulcan Society, the fraternal organization of black firefighters.

    Judge Nicholas Garaufis ruled that from 1999 through 2007, the FDNY 's written examination "unfairly excluded hundreds of qualified people of color" from being considered as firefighters. The case is still pending.

    Until 1977, women weren't even allowed to apply for jobs as firefighters, and it wasn't until 1982 that women finally passed the physical. Brenda Berkman, who retired in 2006, filed a lawsuit against the city in '82, arguing the exam discriminated against women and that some of the tougher requirements were unnecessary for the job. She won and was one of 47 women who passed a revised physical exam.

    But times have changed, according to Uniformed Fire Officers Association president Alexander Hagan.

    "The men and women of the FDNY are much more open-minded than they're generally portrayed to be," he said.

    "We know [Denerstein] has a great résumé and if she is offered the job. We hope she takes it."

    Denerstein, the daughter of a Jewish father and a black mother, is married to a schoolteacher, has two children and resides in Brooklyn's Flatbush section, sources say.

    FDNY insiders said Chief of Department Salvatore Cassano, a 40-year veteran who when he turns 65 -- the usual retirement age -- in January would need an age waiver from the mayor, is also a strong contender.

    Denerstein and a spokesman for Mayor Bloomberg declined to discuss the selection process.

  3. #5403
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    Question

    Do you get a letter or anything aout the psych results?
    Last edited by nightowl75; 12-11-2009 at 05:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nightowl75 View Post
    Do you get a letter or anything aout the psych results?
    Not if you pass it.

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    Default fdny

    is 6019 getting extended? has it been confirmed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by QCFRANKC View Post
    is 6019 getting extended? has it been confirmed?
    no nothing's been confirmed yet.

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    Great post, sleepy, thanks for that.

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    Firestorm over lady 'commish'
    Comments: 30

    Sex, race hot issues at FDNY
    By MURRAY WEISS, DAVID SEIFMAN and GINGER ADAMS OTIS

    Last Updated: 11:29 AM, December 14, 2009

    Posted: 4:44 AM, December 14, 2009

    If Mylan Denerstein becomes the FDNY's new commissioner, the first blazes she'll have to put out will likely involve sexism and racism -- over her own appointment.<p>
    </p><br>
    The 42-year-old former federal prosecutor is on the short list to be named the city's next fire commissioner -- leading to the possibility she would be the first woman and one of the first African-Americans to hold the job.<p>
    </p><br>
    Some department insiders worried that there may be old-boy elements who would have trouble accepting a woman in charge of the FDNY, where only 33 out of 11,300 firefighters are female.<p>
    </p><br>
    "You know how the rank and file feel about women historically," said a department source. "There are still elements of misogyny."<p>
    </p><br>
    Others said her race also could be an issue on a force where only 3 percent of its members are black and that is now fighting a class-action, racial-discrimination lawsuit.<p>
    </p><br>
    Still others would resent that yet another nonfirefighter was in charge, after seven years of rule by Nicholas Scoppetta, who, like Denerstein, is a lawyer.<p>
    </p><br>
    "There are people who will go nuts if she is the fire commissioner," the source said. "She's not a fireman."<p>
    </p><br>
    One Queens firefighter told The Post: "Some guys will feel that, no matter how skilled and smart she is, they're looking to make a political statement because she's a woman and black.<p>
    </p><br>
    "If they make a political decision to deflect criticism of a force that's perceived to be white and male-dominated, it's pretty crappy."<p>
    </p><br>
    A firefighter in Brooklyn added: "I'm not happy about it. We've had chiefs who are firefighters, and we've had chiefs who weren't. But the mayor is going to do what he wants to do."<p>
    </p><br>
    On a Web site frequented by firefighters, one comment read, "Please, no, dear God," to Denerstein's possible commission.<p>
    </p><br>
    Joining Denerstein on the short list is at least one former firefighter, Chief of Department Salvatore Cassano.<p>
    </p><br>
    While Denerstein was never a smoke eater, she is a department veteran. She served from 2003 to 2006 as the deputy commissioner for legal affairs. The job made her, in effect, the FDNY's top disciplinarian.<p>
    </p><br>
    Some insiders bristled at some of the tough moves she made to crack down on firefighter misbehavior. These included naming a former prosecutor to head the Trials Department -- the FDNY's disciplinary wing -- and leading a zero-tolerance crackdown on drug use.<p>
    </p><br>
    Some department sources feel this experience will serve her well. While other rank-and-file members may be skeptical of her and her background, many of the FDNY's top brass already know and respect her.<p>
    </p><br>
    "I think she'll do fine," said one veteran official. "Everyone likes her. She was very highly regarded when she was here."<p>
    </p><br>
    Another source noted that there would be "no learning curve" because she has no FDNY experience.<p>
    </p><br>
    Her possible appointment came as several City Council members and reps from organizations for black and Hispanic Bravest were set to hold a press conference today to push for legislation that would give extra credit on the firefighter exam to those candidates who graduated from a city high school.<p>
    </p><br>
    "I believe she will have no trouble," added Alexander Hagen, president of the Uniformed Fire Officer's Association. "From what I understand, she is very intelligent and a pleasure to be around."<p>
    </p><br>
    Additional reporting by Kevin Fasick, Todd Venezia and Philip Messing<p>
    </p><br>
    murray.weiss@nypost.com
    <p>
    </p><br>
    PRINT EMAIL SHARE

    Yahoo! BuzzDiggRedditFark ItNewsvineStumbleUponTwitterFacebook RSSIf Mylan Denerstein becomes the FDNY's new commissioner, the first blazes she'll have to put out will likely involve sexism and racism -- over her own appointment.

    The 42-year-old former federal prosecutor is on the short list to be named the city's next fire commissioner -- leading to the possibility she would be the first woman and one of the first African-Americans to hold the job.

    Some department insiders worried that there may be old-boy elements who would have trouble accepting a woman in charge of the FDNY, where only 33 out of 11,300 firefighters are female.


    LADDER CLIMB: Former federal prosecutor Mylan Denerstein's candidacy as FDNY commissioner isn't popular with the rank and file.
    "You know how the rank and file feel about women historically," said a department source. "There are still elements of misogyny."

    Others said her race also could be an issue on a force where only 3 percent of its members are black and that is now fighting a class-action, racial-discrimination lawsuit.

    Still others would resent that yet another nonfirefighter was in charge, after seven years of rule by Nicholas Scoppetta, who, like Denerstein, is a lawyer.

    "There are people who will go nuts if she is the fire commissioner," the source said. "She's not a fireman."

    One Queens firefighter told The Post: "Some guys will feel that, no matter how skilled and smart she is, they're looking to make a political statement because she's a woman and black.

    "If they make a political decision to deflect criticism of a force that's perceived to be white and male-dominated, it's pretty crappy."

    A firefighter in Brooklyn added: "I'm not happy about it. We've had chiefs who are firefighters, and we've had chiefs who weren't. But the mayor is going to do what he wants to do."

    On a Web site frequented by firefighters, one comment read, "Please, no, dear God," to Denerstein's possible commission.

    Joining Denerstein on the short list is at least one former firefighter, Chief of Department Salvatore Cassano.

    While Denerstein was never a smoke eater, she is a department veteran. She served from 2003 to 2006 as the deputy commissioner for legal affairs. The job made her, in effect, the FDNY's top disciplinarian.

    Some insiders bristled at some of the tough moves she made to crack down on firefighter misbehavior. These included naming a former prosecutor to head the Trials Department -- the FDNY's disciplinary wing -- and leading a zero-tolerance crackdown on drug use.

    Some department sources feel this experience will serve her well. While other rank-and-file members may be skeptical of her and her background, many of the FDNY's top brass already know and respect her.

    "I think she'll do fine," said one veteran official. "Everyone likes her. She was very highly regarded when she was here."

    Another source noted that there would be "no learning curve" because she has no FDNY experience.

    Her possible appointment came as several City Council members and reps from organizations for black and Hispanic Bravest were set to hold a press conference today to push for legislation that would give extra credit on the firefighter exam to those candidates who graduated from a city high school.

    "I believe she will have no trouble," added Alexander Hagen, president of the Uniformed Fire Officer's Association. "From what I understand, she is very intelligent and a pleasure to be around."



    Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/f...#ixzz0ZhIue8BM

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    3 New Yorkers Play Santa, Bestow $12K Each on People Who Don't Even Work Here Anymore!
    By Graham Rayman in Featured, Graham RaymanMonday, Dec. 14 2009 @ 4:16PM
    Oh look at the sweet Christmas gifts your taxes bought!
    ​Christmas is coming a little early for certain New Yorkers, thanks to your taxes.

    Once again, the state is handing out cash bonuses of $12,000 each to thousands of police officers and firefighters who don't even work for the city anymore, according to the Citizens Budget Commission.

    The bonuses, known technically as the Variable Supplement Fund, are given to folks from the NYPD and FDNY who have retired and earned a pension. Officers who reached pension age but didn't retire are also eligible. Those who got the lucrative disability pensions, however, are not eligible.

    In the past 8 years, the amount the pension fund is paying for these bonuses has jumped by 152 percent -- from $164 million in 2001 to $414 million this year.

    Why is that? Well...

    ...the VSFs used to be determined by how well the stocks in the pension fund did. But that was changed a long time ago, meaning that the VSF isn't variable at all. It's a fixed number. In addition, a cost-of-living adjustment added in 2000 used to count against the VSF number. But the state Legislature eliminated that in 2006.

    Making matters worse, the economic meltdown cut pension fund assets in half since 2007, meaning that the city may eventually have to start paying for the bonuses, unless the state Legislature does something to reduce or eliminate them.

    "If we get to the point where the benefits due the retirees are greater than what the pension fund can pay, it's the city that will have to fork over the money, says Maria Doulis, a CBC researcher. "And the city's pension costs are already huge."

    Indeed, says a Bloomberg spokesman. "The city is already paying billions a year to cover the cost of the city's outdated and unaffordable pension system," says Marc LaVorgna.

    He adds that Bloomberg has been trying for years to get Albany to do away with the VSF. Most recently, Gov. Paterson included such a measure in his pension bill, but the Legislature chopped it out.

    Merry X-Mas, New York!

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    Default here we go again

    Updated 12/11/2009 06:49 PM
    Woman Being Considered For FDNY's Top Post
    By: NY1 News


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    A woman is among those on the short list to be named the city’s next fire commissioner.

    Sources tell NY1 that Mylan Denerstein is being considered for the position. If named, she would be the first woman to be city fire commissioner.

    Denerstein is no stranger to the New York City Fire Department, having served as deputy fire commissioner for legal affairs from 2003 to 2006.

    She has served as executive deputy attorney general for social justice for New York State since January 2007.

    FDNY Chief of Department Salvatore Cassano is also in the running.

    While Mayor Michael Bloomberg would not say today who he is considering, he did mention that the next commissioner will need to be able to do more with less.

    "We will pick the person that I think is best able to take the best Fire Department and the world and take it forward," he said. "Our budget is clearly going to require us to spend less at the fire department, just like it's going to require us to spend less at virtually every other department. And one of the things I am looking for is who can take this department and try new things and make it better."

    Current FDNY Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta announced in October he will step down at the end of the year.

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    the mayor proposes his budget in about a month, i imagine then and only then will we get some solid answers
    I should have cleaned up the chili.....why didn't I clean up the chili!!!!!!

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    Governor Enacts Tier 5, Reducing Pension Rights
    Applies to Future Workers
    By RICHARD STEIER
    GOVERNOR PATERSON: ‘Significant pension reform.’ Governor Paterson Dec. 10 signed into law the Tier 5 pension bill that will offer lesser benefits to future workers, in most cases by requiring them to work longer to qualify for a full retirement allowance and increasing the percentage of salary they must contribute to help fund it.

    The measure, which he signed at the North Hempstead Town Hall in Manhasset, L.I., applies to future city Teachers as well as virtually all public employees under the jurisdiction of the state and its other municipalities. The other city unions, as well as those whose members work for New York City Transit, are not affected.

    A Step Towards Accountability’

    Calling it “the most-significant pension reform” since Tier 4 was created a quarter-century earlier, Mr. Paterson said the new law represented “another critical step toward making our government more accountable to taxpayers.”

    MAYOR BLOOMBERG: Looking for bargaining partners. Most state workers hired beginning Jan. 1 will now have to work until age 62 to qualify for a full pension, compared to the current standard of 55, and will have their allowances reduced by up to 38 percent if they leave service early. They will also have to contribute 3 percent of salary to the system for as long as they are accumulating pension credit.

    Pensions will not be guaranteed until after 10 years’ service, five more than at present, and a similar increase will be imposed—in this case going to 15 years from the standard of 10—before they are assured of continued healthbenefit coverage once they retire.

    Future cops and firefighters employed outside the five boroughs retain the right to retire after 20 years’ service, regardless of age, but will have to contribute 3 percent of salary to their pensions. They also face the biggest potential hit under a cap on overtime imposed for all those workers: where civilians are limited to having $15,000 in overtime earnings included in calculating their pension allowances, cops and firefighters will have the cap set at 15 percent of their base pay.

    New Court Workers Pay More

    New state court employees with peace officer status will maintain the right to retire at age 55 provided they have 30 years’ service, but they will have to contribute 4 percent of salary, a point more than those already on the job.

    There are several key differences in how the law will apply to city Teachers and those elsewhere in the state as the result of a separate deal the United Federation of Teachers reached with the Bloomberg administration six months ago.

    57 New Retirement Age for NYSUT

    Future UFT members under that agreement retained the right to retire at age 55 if they had completed 27 years of service, while those represented by New York State United Teachers will need to be 57 to qualify for a full pension.

    New city Teachers will contribute 4.85 percent of salary to the pension system for their first 27 years on the job and 1.85 percent after that, where those already working have the 4.85- percent contribution drop to 1.85 percent after 10 years and cease after 27. They will also receive a maximum return of 7 percent on Tax-Deferred Annuity accounts, compared to 8.25 percent for those already on the job.

    Teachers outside the city who belong to the state Teachers Retirement System will contribute 3.5 percent of salary to their pensions, a half-point more than those already on the job, and must pay that percentage for all the time that they accumulate pension credit.

    Longer to Hit 2% Threshold

    Those state TRS members will also reach the point at which they have their allowances calculated at 2 percent of salary for each year of service after 25 years, compared to 20 for those already on the job. Until then, they accumulate credit at 1.67 percent of salary for each year of service.

    The hardest hit under the bill will be endured by future members of the two largest state-employee unions, the Civil Service Employees Association and the Public Employees Federation. They agreed to terms this spring as a way of averting the potential layoff of thousands of their members.

    The Governor estimated the pension change at present will save the state and its localities $35 billion over the next 30 years, although the bulk of the savings will come during the latter part of that period. The Bloomberg administration has estimated that under the portion of the law covering the UFT, it will save $19 million in the coming year through reduced pension costs, with the greatest savings coming further down the line as the ranks of employees with no reduction in their salary contributions after 10 years grow greater.

    PBA, UFA May Seek Shift

    The rest of the municipal unions until now have resisted the Mayor’s call for Tier 5 deals. The Governor’s veto in June of a bill that would have extended Tier 2 benefits to future cops and firefighters placed those hired by the city since July under Tier 3, which requires them to work 22 years to qualify for a full pension, and 25 if they want to receive cost-of-living adjustments that are paid to all Tier 2 members with 20-year service retirements.

    Those disadvantages led Detectives Endowment Association President Michael J. Palladino to say earlier this month that he believes the entry-level unions for cops and firefighters, the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association and Uniformed Firefighters Association, might be more amenable to negotiating a Tier 5 setup since their state counterparts preserved the right to retire after 20 years at full pension. They also retained the legal presumption that any of a number of disabling illnesses and ailments are job-related and therefore entitle their members to tax-free pensions equivalent to 75 percent of their average salary over their final three years of service. (For city cops and firefighters, disability pensions are based on their final year’s earnings, which usually is more advantageous.)

    The leaders of the PBA and UFA have so far refrained from comment about the Tier 5 changes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyHollow View Post
    the mayor proposes his budget in about a month, i imagine then and only then will we get some solid answers
    Man, that month can't come soon enough. I'm dying to find out what the guy proposes. Oy!
    6019- was sitting at 13xx
    2000- now sitting at 18xx

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    Anyone that went to the CPAT orientation last month get a CPAT letter yet or hear anything about possible dates?

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    http://ny1.com/5-manhattan-news-cont...for-city-grads

    12/14/2009 09:53 PM
    FDNY Exam Credit Being Considered For City Grads
    By: NY1 News


    The City Council is looking to make it easier for New Yorkers to join the fire department.

    Council members held a hearing Monday on an amendment to give an eight point credit on the firefighters entrance exam to those who graduate from a city high school.

    Legislators and minority members of the FDNY say they are looking to not only increase the number of native New Yorkers who work for the fire department, but also the number of non-white applicants.

    Minority firefighters have long complained of a lack of diversity in the department. And other critics say too many firefighters live outside the city limits.

    They say the amendment is a positive step toward making sure the fire department reflects the city it protects.

    "It's a legitimate, practical and common sense solution to addressing diversity issues within the FDNY," said City Councilman Leroy Comrie.

    "We're not sure how the administration is going to react to this but if there's broad support among the people and support within the council we can get this done to the benefit of all New York City residents," said Former Vulcan Society President Paul Washington.

    The bill is supported by FDNY advocacy groups for Hispanic and African-American members.

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    Soooooo...........they wanna give more credit for this than to vets?? Just making sure I read this correctly.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Queens6019 View Post
    http://ny1.com/5-manhattan-news-cont...for-city-grads

    12/14/2009 09:53 PM
    FDNY Exam Credit Being Considered For City Grads
    By: NY1 News


    The City Council is looking to make it easier for New Yorkers to join the fire department.

    Council members held a hearing Monday on an amendment to give an eight point credit on the firefighters entrance exam to those who graduate from a city high school.

    Legislators and minority members of the FDNY say they are looking to not only increase the number of native New Yorkers who work for the fire department, but also the number of non-white applicants.

    Minority firefighters have long complained of a lack of diversity in the department. And other critics say too many firefighters live outside the city limits.

    They say the amendment is a positive step toward making sure the fire department reflects the city it protects.

    "It's a legitimate, practical and common sense solution to addressing diversity issues within the FDNY," said City Councilman Leroy Comrie.

    "We're not sure how the administration is going to react to this but if there's broad support among the people and support within the council we can get this done to the benefit of all New York City residents," said Former Vulcan Society President Paul Washington.

    The bill is supported by FDNY advocacy groups for Hispanic and African-American members.

    This could get real tricky...are city schools limited to public city schools? Or would private city schools count as well?

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    Bill would give bonus for HS graduates applying to the FDNY
    BY Jonathan Lemire
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Tuesday, December 15th 2009, 4:00 AM
    A bill to give a bonus to city high school graduates applying to the FDNY - and potentially increase diversity within the nearly all-white Fire Department - will come before the City Council.

    The measure, announced Monday by a team of Council members and the FDNY's Vulcan Society, would give an eight-point bonus to applicants who graduated from schools within the five boroughs.

    "We want firefighters to be representative of our neighborhoods and speak the languages of our neighborhoods," said Leroy Comrie (D-Queens). "That is not currently the case."

    Diversity has long been a hot-button issue for the FDNY, as approximately 91% of its 11,600 uniformed members are white and nearly 99% are male.

    The Vulcans, a fraternal organization of black firefighters, believe the high school credit - which would be added to a candidate's combined score on the written and physical exams - will help level the playing field. Currently, candidates who can prove city residency get a five-point bonus, which the Vulcans feel is ineffective.

    "It doesn't take much for a candidate to call his aunt and get an electric bill in his name at her address," said Vulcan Society President John Coombs. "That's a sham."

    About 4,500 firefighters currently live in the city, FDNY sources said.

    Twelve Council members are co-sponsoring the bill, which will come up for a vote next month.

    This summer, a federal judge ruled the FDNY's 1999 and 2002 exams excluded at least 1,000 blacks and Latinos from jobs. The number of minority applicants who passed the most recent exam, in 2007, jumped to 38% - up from 21% in 2002.

    "We'd be open to listening to anything that would improve upon our success," said FDNY spokesman Jim Long.

    jlemire@nydailynews.com
    Related Topics

    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009...#ixzz0ZljegJCy

  19. #5419
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    Quote Originally Posted by Queens6019 View Post


    "We want firefighters to be representative of our neighborhoods and speak the languages of our neighborhoods," said Leroy Comrie (D-Queens). "That is not currently the case."


    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009...#ixzz0ZljegJCy


    our language? THIS IS THE UNITED ****ING STATES! The language is ENGLISH MOTHER ****ER!

    I am NOT a racist, but this is starting to turn me into one.....

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    You guys ever get a look at this joke of a councilman Leroy Comrie? The freakin guy literally resembles a walrus. He looks like he can barely get up out of his chair, yet he wants to dictate who gets into the fire dept. Nevermind the fact that he should not even be here serving a third term to concoct this bill.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by FDsouthbxNY View Post
    our language? THIS IS THE UNITED ****ING STATES! The language is ENGLISH MOTHER ****ER!

    I am NOT a racist, but this is starting to turn me into one.....

    Totally agree. They are trying to say the same thing over here on St. Paul FD. They also are despirately trying to get more Hmong's, Chinese, Japanese, etc. onto the Fire Department, but literally NONE ever test or even apply!! It seems as if they are practically forcing them to apply just so we can have more "diversity" and have, as you mentioned, more Firefighters be able to speak "our" neighborhood's language.

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    Upswing in Tax Revenues Helps NYC Bear State Cuts
    by Bob Hennelly

    Download MP3 | Embed HTML
    NEW YORK, NY December 15, 2009 —Governor Paterson's move to freeze hundreds-of-millions of dollars in aid to local governments, comes as the Bloomberg Administration reports an upswing in local tax revenues. WNYC's Bob Hennelly has more.

    REPORTER: Paterson's emergency budget move cost the City $84 million in expected education and municipal aid. But thanks to City tax revenues running $680 million ahead of projections, the City can handle the hit for now. The Governor says the State Constitution does not permit him to freeze funds for some communities and spare others.

    PATERSON: When a Governor starts being selective in holding back payments then the Governor is acting as a legislature. The Governor can only delay payments to make sure that the state doesn't become insolvent.

    REPORTER: The Bloomberg Administration is still counting on getting its $84 million - eventually. For WNYC, I'm Bob Hennelly.

  23. #5423
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    just ran into some one that was is the army .... he got his cpat dates . CPAT is going to be the hole month of jan.....well if you dont pass the first time

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    8 points for graduating from a city high school? something that millions of people have done in the past and will do in the future. i mean graduating from any hs isnt that big of an accomplishment. as a veteran iam absolutely amazed and appalled that a hs gradute would get 3 more points than i or any other vet

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    your a 100% right this is America we speak english here...when my ancestors came here years and years ago they learned the language and adopted the culture and were proud to be american (but still didnt forget where they came from) now its the opposite people don't learn the language and are not forced to learn it (everyone gets catered to) and there the first people to go collect welfare medicare etc.... (cheat the system) its liberal america welcome to the new age ( you dont see that threre trying to turn christmas into happy holidays and turn everything around..this country was built on christian values and hard work and determination... this country is headed to the dumps and so is the city...best man should get the job wether it be white black spanish chinese mexican don't lower standards to make a quota because you are not helping anyone out...plain and simple study for the simple common sense entry test( if you cant pass that you shouldnt be hired anyway because you lack common sense and i believe you need alil of that to save someones life) then if you pass the test get in shape and look to get hired but instead people will cry that only 2% are black and they have there hand out thinking there owed something instead of working harder to get a job that myself a white man studied for and passed.....plain and simple you want something work hard for it what ever race you are and good things will happen.....((

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