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    Bloomberg Orders Hiring Freeze Because of Senate Gridlock

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Mayor Michael Bloomberg is ordering an immediate hiring freeze because he says the state Senate gridlock is holding up new tax revenue for the city.

    The freeze delays indefinitely a class of 250 police recruits who were to be sworn in on Wednesday.

    The city is also putting off planned hires of firefighters, traffic agents, school crossing guards and EMTs.

    The state must approve new tax measures that were included in the city's budget for fiscal year 2010, which began July 1.

    Without them, the mayor says the city is losing $60 million a month.

    http://www.1010wins.com/Bloomberg-Or...Freeze/4745022


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    Time to write to them and recommend they pull their heads out of their @sses. The state senate is a laughing stock.

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    Forum Member SleepyHollow's Avatar
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    I should have cleaned up the chili.....why didn't I clean up the chili!!!!!!

  4. #4344
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    So that story gave a number of 150 firefighters.
    Honestly fellas, pushing that many into our ranks doesn't really help us much right now.
    We're still way over headcount and that would keep the door open to the possibility of layoffs in the future IMO.
    Not a good place to be if YOU are on the bubble.

    This news sucks for all of you, I know. In the meantime, keep going on with your lives and stay in shape.

    Hang tough.
    bam
    Last edited by ffbam24; 07-06-2009 at 04:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matty21 View Post
    Bloomberg Orders Hiring Freeze Because of Senate Gridlock

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Mayor Michael Bloomberg is ordering an immediate hiring freeze because he says the state Senate gridlock is holding up new tax revenue for the city.

    The freeze delays indefinitely a class of 250 police recruits who were to be sworn in on Wednesday.

    The city is also putting off planned hires of firefighters, traffic agents, school crossing guards and EMTs.

    The state must approve new tax measures that were included in the city's budget for fiscal year 2010, which began July 1.

    Without them, the mayor says the city is losing $60 million a month.

    http://www.1010wins.com/Bloomberg-Or...Freeze/4745022
    Bull$hit, Bull$hit, Bull$hit. Until the state senate kisses and makes up. they can't pass the tier 5 pension legislation and Bloomturd won't hire anyone without it.

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    Mayor Bloomberg today again slammed the warring state senators for blowing the June 30 mayoral control deadline and is poised to announce their failure to pass the sales tax increase the city needs to balance its budget has pushed him to institute an immediate hiring freeze.

    The freeze will last as long as the gridlock prevents the passage of the tax hike, costing the city an estimated $60 million worth of revenue a month.

    Positions impacted include the 250-member class of NYPD recruits who were set to enter the academy this week (the mayor was supposed to swear them in on Wednesday), as well as:

    - 150 Firefighters
    - 151 Traffic Agents
    - 34 Emergency 911 Operators
    - 175 School Safety Agents
    - 150 School Crossing Guards
    - 90 Emergency Medical Technicians
    - 20 3-1-1 Operators

    The mayor has ordered a review of all contracts with independent agencies that provide services to the city. (These typically start at the beginning of the fiscal year, which was July 1).

    During a Q&A with reporters, including DN City Hall Bureau Chief Adam Lisberg, Bloomberg said he has asked Deputy Mayor Ed Skyler to compile a list of projects that will have to be postponed due to a lack of cash.

    The mayor insisted "everything is on the table". But at the same time, he expressed a reluctance to "jump the gun" and "panic," noting it's the gridlock could end any day.

    "(Y)ou know, you try to explain to people: We're going to pick a date; by X date, this is what happens,' Bloomberg said. "If the day after you change your mind, it's too late."

    "And, you know, Albany never seems to understand deadlines. They thought that the deadline for control of the, mayoral control of the schools was just an artificial one. There was nothing artificial about it. We've now opened a Pandora's box, and I don't know what's going to happen when we try to put Pandora, put Pandora's stuff back in and close it. Nobody knows."

    "But, you know, when you want to explain to your kids that dates mean something, it's hard to do that given what's given what's gone on in Albany. They always wait until the last minute, and sometimes they just think that the deadlines that you establish aren't real."

    "These deadlines are real," the mayor concluded. "...If every time every date means nothing, you can't run a government that way. You can't run an organization. You can't make commitments and promises. And it's a terrible role model for our children."



    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dai...xzz0KWCSXPUA&C

    Without them, the mayor says the city is losing $60 million a month.
    Last edited by Queens6019; 07-06-2009 at 06:03 PM.

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    Albany Power Struggle Causes City Hiring Freeze
    WNYC Newsroom
    NEW YORK, NY July 06, 2009 —Mayor Bloomberg has ordered an immediate hiring freeze, and a review of all city contracts, as the ongoing stalemate in New York's State Senate threatens the city's spending plans.

    REPORTER: The city stands to lose $60 million in extra revenue this month, and every month thereafter, if the Senate continues to take no action on the city's request for a sales tax hike. On the list of frozen new positions -- 150 firefighters, 34 emergency 911 operators, and 250 police recruits who were to enter the Police Academy this Wednesday.

    BLOOMBERG: Does it mean that everything on it is going to get done? it doesn't mean we have to implement any of those things. it depends on what happens in Albany.

    REPORTER: Bloomberg says if the Senate inaction continues much longer, he will have to make more cuts to city spending, to keep the budget balanced. State Senators held another special session today. They did not take up any legislation.
    Last edited by Queens6019; 07-06-2009 at 06:01 PM.

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    NYC Orders Hiring Freeze, Review of City Contracts (Update1)

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    By Jeremy R. Cooke

    July 6 (Bloomberg) -- New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg halted hiring and sought a review of contracts to keep the city’s budget balanced as a nearly monthlong stalemate in the state Senate withholds new revenue.

    Bloomberg ordered an immediate hiring freeze and called for existing staff to ensure the city doesn’t enter into any “non- essential contracts,” according to a news release today. New York City leaders approved a $59.4 billion budget for the fiscal year that began July 1 that includes a half-percentage point increase in the local sales tax and an end to a clothing exemption. Both require legislative approval.

    The Senate’s inaction will cost the most populous U.S. city $60 million in July and another $60 million each month there is inaction, the release said.

    “The state Senate needs to put aside their power struggle and allow our revenue package to move forward, so we can avoid drastic cuts to the core services we fought so hard to protect,” city Council Speaker Christine Quinn said in a separate e-mailed statement after the freeze was announced.

    Bloomberg’s action today delays the swearing-in of 250 police recruits, scheduled for July 8, according to the mayor’s release. The freeze also suspends plans to hire 150 firefighters, 151 traffic agents, 34 emergency 9-1-1 operators, 175 school safety agents, 150 school crossing guards, 90 emergency medical technicians and 20 operators for the non- emergency services 3-1-1 hotline.

    The mayor, a second-term independent, is founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP.


    Hope there is no company closures again.............

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    Hiring Freeze In Effect
    July 6th, 2009
    Two can play at this game.

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced today that the city will enforce a hiring freeze thanks to the State Senate’s failure to pass a .5 percent increase in the city’s sales tax, delaying the hiring of more than 1,000 city employees, including 250 new police officers, who were scheduled to start the academy this week. The mayor says the Senate stalemate will cost the city $60 million this month.

    In addition to the hiring freeze, the city will also kick off a review of all city contracts in hopes of weeding out any that are “non-essential.”

    In a prepared statement, Bloomberg said: “I’ve instructed the city’s budget director to immediately freeze all hiring while the gridlock in the State Senate imperils the city’s budget.This includes a class of 250 police recruits, who were set to enter the academy this week, along with firefighters, school safety agents, 911 and 311 call takers, and EMTs. Further, we will be reviewing all city contracts to ensure we do not enter into non-essential contracts. We have a legal mandate to produce a balanced budget — something we’ve done for seven consecutive years — so we have to act responsibly.”

    More specifically, the city will hold off on hiring:

    150 Firefighters
    151 Traffic Agents
    34 Emergency 911 Operators
    175 School Safety Agents
    150 School Crossing Guards
    90 Emergency Medical Technicians
    20 3-1-1 Operators

    In response to the hiring freeze, Council Speaker Christine Quinn released the following statement:

    “Last month, Mayor Bloomberg and the Council agreed on a $59.4 billion budget that included a $900 million revenue package designed to steer our city through tough economic times without eviscerating core services. That agreement allowed us to save 16 firehouses, maintain citywide, six-day library service and keep ACS child welfare workers on the front lines protecting our most vulnerable children.

    “However, the State Senate’s failure to act is now costing us roughly $2 million dollars a day and our first responders are literally paying the price for it.

    “Today’s hiring freeze places an unnecessary strain on our city’s workforce. The State Senate needs to put aside their power struggle and allow our revenue package to move forward so we can avoid drastic cuts to the core services we fought so hard to protect.”

    Councilmember Peter Vallone, chair of the council’s Public Safety Committee, released this statement:

    “Our first responders should never be first on the chopping block. Police recruits - preparing to enter the academy this week - are now being held hostage by the pathetic ineptitude in Albany. The State Senate’s inability to function may literally result in blood on the streets.”

    By Courtney Gross on July 6, 2009, 3:54 pm
    Last edited by Queens6019; 07-06-2009 at 06:40 PM.

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    NY State Senate Contact
    Information
    Updated: Wednesday, 01 Jul 2009, 3:46 PM EDT
    Published : Wednesday, 01 Jul 2009, 2:56 PM EDT

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg asked New Yorkers to contact their state senator to ask them to get back to work. We compiled the contact information of all of the senators from various state senate Web pages:

    Eric Adams
    District Office:
    Brooklyn
    Phone: (718) 284-4700

    Albany Office:
    Phone: (518) 455-2431
    ---
    Joseph P. Addabbo Jr.
    Albany Office:
    518-455-2322

    District Office:
    Howard Beach
    718-738-1111
    ---
    James S. Alesi
    Albany Office:
    Phone: (518) 455-2015

    District Office:
    Fairport
    Phone: (585) 223-1800
    ---
    Darrel J. Aubertine
    District Office (main office)
    Watertown
    315-782-3418 (office)

    Albany Office
    518-455-2761 (office)
    ---
    John J. Bonacic
    Albany
    (518) 455-3181
    Last edited by matty21; 07-06-2009 at 06:39 PM.

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    By Dave EvansNEW YORK (WABC) -- The stalemate in the New York Senate has forced a hiring freeze in New York City.
    Mayor Michael Bloomberg said he was imposing an immediate hiring freeze to ensure the City meets its legal obligation to maintain a balanced budget, while the State Senate remains unable to act on any legislation.

    [GET EYEWITNESS NEWS DELIVERED: Click here to sign up]
    Story continues belowAdvertisement

    The freeze includes 250 Police Recruits, firefighters, school safety agents, 911 and 311 call takers, and EMTs:
    150 Firefighters
    151 Traffic Agents
    34 Emergency 911 Operators
    175 School Safety Agents
    150 School Crossing Guards
    90 Emergency Medical Technicians
    20 3-1-1 Operators

    "I urge Senators in both parties to put aside their political differences and approve the City's revenue plan so we can move forward with providing the core services that New Yorkers rely on," Mayor Bloomberg said.
    This Wednesday, 250 cadets were set to launch a new career at the police academy. They won't now because of the chaos in Albany.
    The mayor says he had to make a decision and couldn't wait any longer on a senate that remains deadlocked, refusing to vote yeah or nay on bills that affect the city budget.
    "You try to explain to people we're going to pick a date, by x-date this is what happens. If the day after that you change your mind, it's too late. You know Albany never seems to understand deadlines," Bloomberg said.
    The mayor had hoped by now Albany would have approved a half-penny sales tax hike, generating 60-million a month for the city.
    Since that hasn't happened, the mayor ordered the hiring freeze and ordered a review of all City contracts so the City does not enter into non-essential obligations. Contracts under review include the entire universe of City contracts with independent agencies that provide services to the public.
    "I wish we were bluffing. I wish we had enough resources to be bluffing. We're not bluffing," City Council Speaker Chris Quinn said.
    City officials are worried more cuts considered earlier this year, such as library cuts, could return.
    Perhaps fire company closings could be back. Phil DePaolo fought to keep Engine 212 open in Brooklyn years ago. He's afraid up to 16 companies could be closed next year.
    "Every council member has basically told me next year all these engine companies are going to be back on the table because we're running 30 or 35 percent behind in our tax receipts for this year," Phil dePaolo said.

    One idea was broached to get the senate back to work. The governor would appoint a new lieutenant governor. He or she could then break the 31-31 tie.
    "As you know one of the biggest squabbles is they're fighting over who holds the gavel and who would preside over the Senate," Rep. Mike Gianaris said.
    But Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said the idea is not constitutional. He points to a part of the New York constitution that reads "the lt. Governor shall be chosen at the same time and for the same term as the governor."
    The senate must approve new tax measures that were included in the city's budget for fiscal year 2010, which began July 1.
    If the State Senate is unable to act on the revenue package this year, the City stands to lose nearly $900 million.

  12. #4352
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    what is a stepmill machine?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingcals3 View Post
    what is a stepmill machine?
    http://www.fitnessblowout.com/equipment/stair-climber


    Third one down.....

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    This is all political blustering because of the clowns in the state senate. Keep focused. You're going to get hired, they'll hire at least a class of 150 by January and that's really not that far away!

    Don't worry about being hired, then laid-off. They're too smart and will most certainly plan accordingly for a future budget shortfalls. By the time new probies are in the field from a future class, O/T will be more regular than in the past 2 or 3 years. They'll be looking to close that gap.....fast.

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    Governor Paterson backed away from a threat that could have plunged the pension system into chaos when he July 1 signed into law a bill extending a wide variety of retirement-related provisions for another two years.

    That date also marked, however, a reduction in pension rights for future police officers and firefighters who were placed under Tier 3 of the retirement system, a consequence of his veto a month earlier of a bill that had extended Tier 2 rights to those employees every two years since 1981.

    PBA: Will Cost City More

    The change spurred an angry statement from the head of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association that Tier 3 will actually be more costly to the city, although it also requires cops to work longer to qualify for full pensions and reduces certain benefits, including those that surviving spouses receive if they die in the line of duty.

    Police union and pension officials expressed relief that Mr. Paterson thought better of torpedoing the "general extender" bill that provides continued special pension coverage for cops, firefighters and their surviving spouses but also entails matters with a much-broader sweep including Tiers 3 and 4 of the system for all state and city employees.
    "I think he signed it because he knew the chaos that would have been caused if he didn't," said Lou Matarazzo, the legislative director for the Detectives Endowment Association, the Captains Endowment Association and the Public Employee Conference.

    Heeded Comptroller's Warning

    He noted that State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli had sent a letter to the Governor warning of the potentially drastic consequences if Tiers 3 and 4 were eliminated. City lawyers were said to be frantically researching what impact the veto might have had on those currently belonging to the two pension tiers, with no definitive answers available prior to the decision being made to approve the general extender bill.

    Others believed Mr. Paterson had made the threat strictly as a bargaining tool in his attempt to pressure police and fire union leaders to accept a form of Tier 5 for their future members. The two largest state-employee unions, the Civil Service Employees Association and the Public Employees Federation, in early June agreed to support legislation on the matter, with new workers required to serve until age 62 to qualify for a full pension, under a deal that averted several thousand layoffs of their members. Several weeks later, the United Federation of Teachers agreed to a modified version of the new pension tier but retained the right for its future members to leave service at age 55 with a full pension provided they have worked at least 27 years. (Most current UFT members have that right if they are 55 and have 25 years on the job.)

    Cops Feel First Impact

    Mr. Paterson did not have to take any action to move future cops and firefighters into Tier 3; his veto of the Tier 2 extender bill was enough to trigger the change as of July 1. In the city, its immediate impact will be felt by a class of rookie Police Officers whose induction Mayor Bloomberg postponed July 6; the Fire Department has not yet scheduled a new class of Probationary Firefighters.

    PBA President Patrick J. Lynch said in a statement, "In response to editorials calling for pension reform, the city and state have placed police and firefighters in a pension tier that actually costs the city more. Not surprising for Albany."

    He did not elaborate, but he was clearly referring to a unique feature of Tier 3 pertaining to cost-of-living adjustments that will treat longerserving cops and firefighters more generously than those who are covered by Tier 2. While some officials share his view on that score, others believe that on the whole, Tier 3's less-generous aspects will provide savings to the city, state and other municipalities.

    Serve Longer, Contribute More

    Under Tier 3, cops and firefighters will be required to serve 22 years, rather than the traditional 20, in order to qualify for a full pension. It also requires that members contribute a flat 3 percent of salary to the retirement system; current cops and firefighters contribute between .5 and 2.85 percent of their salaries, with the city paying an additional 5 percent on their behalf under what is known as an Increased Take-Home Pay provision for Tier 2.

    Tier 3 also does not allow members to borrow against their pensions, a Tier 2 right that Police Pension Fund Executive Director Tony Garvey recently described as "a lifeline for police officers who have an immediate need for money."

    The survivors of future cops and firefighters covered under Tier 3 will also receive a less-generous accidental death benefit, although it is difficult to quantify how much they will lose. Under Tier 2, surviving spouses were guaranteed to receive the equivalent of the employee's final-year salary through a mix of the basic pension benefit, an annual cost-of-living adjustment, and Social Security. Tier 3 gives the survivors an annual payment of 50 percent of final salary plus an accidental death payment, which even coupled with Social Security, Mr. Garvey said, "may not be as generous as for current widows."

    COLA Could Be Bonanza

    The Tier 3 pension COLA, however, has the potential to be much more costly for the city than under Tier 2.

    Tier 2 cops and firefighters, who can retire at any age after 20 years of service, do not receive their COLA until 10 years after they have retired, and must wait longer than that if they have not yet turned 55. Once they become eligible to collect, it is paid only on the first $18,000 of their basic pension allowance, and at only half the rate of the rise in the Consumer Price Index, with a cap of 3 percent.

    Tier 3 recipients will have to work for 25 years to qualify for a COLA. If they do, however, they will be treated far more generously than their Tier 2 counterparts on a couple of counts. There is no waiting period for them to collect, meaning they could begin receiving it as early as 46. And they will also receive the COLA based on their full pension allowance and at the full rate of the CPI rise, although also with a 3-percent cap.

    This means that if the CPI increased by 3 percent in a year, Tier 2 COLA recipients would get a 1.5 percent boost in their basic allowances, but those under Tier 3 would get the full 3 percent. Because those increases are compounded, it has been estimated that over the years many Tier 3 retirees are likely to wind up doubling their basic pension allowances because of the COLAs.

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    Senate Impasse in Albany Forces City to Impose Hiring Freeze Sign in to Recommend
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    LinkedinDiggFacebookMixxMySpac eYahoo! BuzzPermalinkBy JAMES BARRON
    Published: July 6, 2009

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg imposed an immediate city hiring freeze on Monday, citing “gridlock in the State Senate” that has held up votes on budget measures.

    Skip to next paragraph
    Related
    Thaw in Senate Talks, but No Hints of Power-Sharing Deal (July 4, 2009)
    Times Topics: Michael BloombergHe said the freeze would apply to a class of 250 police recruits who had been scheduled to enter the Police Academy this week.

    The stalemate in Albany will also force the city to postpone filling nearly 800 other jobs for the rest of the summer and to put off hiring 150 firefighters in the fall , he said.[/b]

    The city has been in a holding pattern because the State Legislature has yet to approve tax measures that were included in the city budget for the 2010 fiscal year, which began on Wednesday. At an appearance in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the mayor said he was surprised that the impasse in Albany was continuing.

    “I thought they’d solve their problems two, three weeks ago,” the mayor said. “I don’t think anybody expected this to go on, and yet it does.”

    The mayor estimated that the lack of action in Albany was costing the city $60 million a month.

    “We’re losing roughly a couple million bucks a day,” he said. A statement that the mayor’s office issued later Monday said the city would resort to further spending reductions if the impasse continued.

    “We have a legal mandate to produce a balanced budget,” the mayor said in the statement, “so we have to act responsibly.”

    The police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, issued a statement of his own, lamenting the hiring freeze.

    “It is painfully obvious that gridlock in Albany has real-life consequences,” the commissioner said. “We hope the problem is addressed soon so we can start training the police officers we need.”

    Councilman Peter F. Vallone Jr., the chairman of the Public Safety Committee, said the freeze was painful and should not have been necessary.

    “Our first responders should never be first on the chopping block,” he said. “Police recruits preparing to enter the academy this week are now being held hostage by the pathetic ineptitude in Albany.”

    The Council speaker, Christine C. Quinn, said that “our first responders are literally paying the price” for the impasse and that “stopping the police class would be completely at the bottom of my list” if it had been left to her.

    The list was prepared by Edward Skyler, the deputy mayor for operations, according to a spokesman for the mayor. On the list were 90 emergency medical technicians’ jobs that were to have been filled this month.

    The list also deferred hiring 151 traffic agents next month, 175 school safety agents who would have been assigned to school buildings, and 150 crossing guards who would have taken up posts on street corners near schools.

    City Hall’s plans to hire 34 more operators for 911 and 20 for 311 are also being put off.
    Last edited by Queens6019; 07-06-2009 at 10:48 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FDsouthbxNY View Post
    This is all political blustering because of the clowns in the state senate. Keep focused. You're going to get hired, they'll hire at least a class of 150 by January and that's really not that far away!

    Don't worry about being hired, then laid-off. They're too smart and will most certainly plan accordingly for a future budget shortfalls. By the time new probies are in the field from a future class, O/T will be more regular than in the past 2 or 3 years. They'll be looking to close that gap.....fast.
    Stay away from the Kool-Aid brother
    This miracle budget waiting to be passed in Albany that "saved" a bunch or jobs and kept firehouses from closing is part of the smoke and mirrors and number crunching that Doomberg wants his constituents to believe that he saved the city in order to influence (pronounced "bought") his way into a third term as mayor.

    That said, those of you waiting who may make a January class are literally one year from being in the field. Funny to think of it that way huh?

    As frakked up as our state is right now, at least we aren't writing out IOU's.....California.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ffbam24 View Post
    Stay away from the Kool-Aid brother
    This miracle budget waiting to be passed in Albany that "saved" a bunch or jobs and kept firehouses from closing is part of the smoke and mirrors and number crunching that Doomberg wants his constituents to believe that he saved the city in order to influence (pronounced "bought") his way into a third term as mayor.

    That said, those of you waiting who may make a January class are literally one year from being in the field. Funny to think of it that way huh?

    As frakked up as our state is right now, at least we aren't writing out IOU's.....California.
    I agree with you bro, in most aspects. There is no question that his need for votes this Nov. saved the better part of the proposed cuts. However, I don't believe they were ever going to close all of those that they originally proposed and they were NEVER going to lay-off. You just had to look at the numbers. Had they closed those company's, they would simply be taking the place of future proby classes, no lay-offs. Now without closures, they're going to need to hire. Even if they close companies starting a year from now, they'll need the guys they hire early in '10. They certainly won't need many more hires with future closings though.


    All of that said, lets not fall into the trap of "rant-style" pessimism. No one knows what's going to happen after Bloomberg starts term three and certainly the crystal ball does't see into 2010.

    Train hard, eyes on the prize.
    Last edited by FDsouthbxNY; 07-07-2009 at 09:59 AM.

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    FINEST FEELING ALBANY FREEZE
    Read CommentsLeave a CommentBy DAVID SEIFMAN in New York and BRENDAN SCOTT in Albany
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    TODAY'S HOT TOPICS
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    MEGAN FOXBERNARD MADOFFLISA MARIE PRESLEYSACHA BARON COHENELIZABETH TAYLORMICHAEL JACKSONFARRAH FAWCETThide topics THIS WEEK'S HOT TOPICS
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    MICHAEL JACKSONLISA MARIE PRESLEYBERNARD MADOFFMEGAN FOXRUSSELL SIMMONSELIZABETH TAYLORFARRAH FAWCETThide topics Last updated: 9:58 am
    July 7, 2009
    Posted: 2:53 am
    July 7, 2009

    Reacting to the state Senate's mind-boggling fifth week of do-nothing deadlock, Mayor Bloomberg yesterday ordered an immediate citywide hiring freeze that will block 250 recruits from attending the Police Academy tomorrow.

    EDITORIAL: CUT, MIKE, CUT

    MAC DONALD: DON'T CUT COPS

    The mayor also delayed 770 other public-safety hires for as long as a $900 million city tax package is held hostage to the Senate stalemate. It was scheduled to take effect July 1.

    In another action designed to get the attention of the dug-in Senate, Bloomberg put a hold on all "non-essential" city contracts, including those with local nonprofit and community groups.

    The mayor has gone out of his way not to choose sides in the upstate showdown, where a 31-31 Democratic-Republican split has had the Senate at a standstill since June 8.

    But he said fiscal prudence dictated the city act now, since it's losing $60 million a month just on Albany's failure to approve a half-point increase in the sales tax, which would have boosted it from 8.375 percent to 8.875 percent.

    "I thought they'd solve their problems two or three weeks ago," the mayor said.

    "I don't think anybody expected this to go on. Yet it does."

    Veteran Albany watchers, as dumbfounded as everyone else by the stalemate saga, weren't ready to predict that the mayor's move would spur the warring factions to compromise.

    David Weprin (D-Queens), chairman of the City Council Finance Committee, praised the mayor for acting responsibly, but warned that the Senate was now divided by "raw politics" and unlikely to be affected.

    "It's not like you're talking about layoffs; it's just a hiring freeze," he observed.

    Peter Vallone (D-Queens) was more grim. "The state Senate's inability to function may literally result in blood on the streets," he maintained, reacting to the NYPD hiring delay.

    Sources said half of 250 police recruits were cadets already enrolled in the academy, taking prep courses.

    The bad news that their jobs were indefinitely postponed was delivered to many of the cadets during classes.

    Later this month, the city is scheduled to hire 90 new emergency medical technicians.

    In August, 151 traffic agents; 150 school crossing guards and 175 school safety agents are supposed to join the payroll.

    Another 150 firefighters are expected in the fall.

    All those hirings are now frozen. Officials said exceptions would be made in cases of "extraordinary needs."

    In Albany, meanwhile, Assemblyman Michael Gianaris (D-Queens) argued that a little-noticed section of state Public Officers Law allows Gov. Paterson to appoint a lieutenant governor -- an act scholars have long thought would have to wait until the next election.

    The office has been vacant since former Gov. Eliot Spitzer resigned in March 2008, and his lieutenant, Paterson, took over.

    Paterson said the power cited by Gianaris has "been under review for some time" by his counsel. But Democratic Attorney General Andrew Cuomo -- a potential Paterson rival -- argued the proposal was "not constitutional."

    The end of the Albany circus can't come too soon.

    There was a blow-up over the holiday weekend in a closed-door powwow between Senate Democratic leaders and the governor.

    "We asked the governor to stop blaming us and start blaming the [Sen. Pedro] Espada coalition for not passing this legislation, and he agreed," said Sen. Jeffrey Klein (D-Bronx) after the meeting.

    Additional reporting by Sally Goldenberg and Larry Celona

    david.seifman@nypost.com

  20. #4360
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    89

    Thumbs down

    fdsouthbx did u hear anything about a class going in for the fall? i feel for the 205 cops that were going in tomorrow.. it sucks 2 days away and they would have been cops....it sucked when they cancel the jan 09 class and they gave us a little more time then just 2 days...so we could take back our 2 week notice ....
    Last edited by LongQuest; 07-07-2009 at 06:24 PM.

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