1. #1

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    Default CPAT in 11 weeks! Help!

    As the above states, I have my cpat in exactly 11 weeks from today. I'm haven't worked out in awhile, so I'm pretty raw. However, I did recieve my 75lb. weight vest in the mail today so I do have that going for me. I don't know anything about developing a routine or a proper workout to have me prepared. So any advice, tips, routines, or ANYTHING you can provide me with to help me pass this test will be greatly appreciated... as stated...I have 11 weeks to prepare.

    Thanks.

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    I just started also, right now I am working out with the Iaff workout. Google cpat workouts and it is usually the first thing to come up. I also bought a 75lb vest and currently do stairs two/three times a week. Basically I am lifting and running on Monday and Friday. Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday consist of running and stairs w/ the vest. Good Luck with the test.

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    Default cpat sites

    like the above person said there are a ton of descriptions and ideas on how to pass the cpat out there. Here are some links:
    http://www.nwtc.edu/PublicSafety/Fir...ility_Test.pdf
    http://www.eatstress.com/agility2.htm
    http://www.fireagility.com/index.php

    It's not really as bad as you think. Be sure to study on your fire exams or tests too. A good site with decent questions is www.fire-fighter-exam.com. Good luck on your test

  4. #4
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    stairmaster, stairmaster, stairmaster..lol
    Probationary Firefighter

    FF/EMT-B
    Paramedic in training..

  5. #5
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    Default Step Mill Training

    No matter how hard you train for the stair climb, your legs will feel like rubber when you're through. The time it takes to recover from this depends on your fitness level and your V02 Max. VO2 Max is the maximum amount of oxygen your body can process in order to feed your muscles to do work. In tests like the CPAT, if your VO2 Max is not high enough, you simply fail. Your legs may give out, or worse, you may become injured.
    To avoid these pitfalls, you must train properly!
    Gradually pushing up your limits over time can allow your body to compensate a little bit each time. This allows your heart and lungs to get stronger each time, thus preparing you for more, harder work the next time.
    This is an event that is really easy to train for. You simply need a road-map of how much weight to use when, and a plan of how to safely increase resistance and duration. You really do need a weight vest for this. They are sold at weightvest.com.
    Remember that training on the step mill is only part of the training process necessary for training for the CPat. Your legs need to be trained with medium to heavy weights. This step mill training plan is only a very small part of the bigger picture. If all you do for your legs is this training plan, you will probably fail the CPat.
    Warning! Many people train with a back pack full of sand, or by carrying a weight plate. Don't do this! It changes the biomechanics, and puts your spine at risk! It causes small amounts of injury each time you do it. This adds up, and will cause you problems in the future. As you age, you are much more likely to hurt your back. These sorts of injury are often career changing, if not career ending! Use a weight vest!
    Another Warning! See your physician before beginning any exercise program! If at any time, you feel dizzy, sick, or sore for more than 48 hours in one particular area, stop doing the offending exercise! Ask your doctorís opinion! Remember that no everyoneís body is intended for these uses!
    Watch your Achilles tendons!
    Make sure when you step up onto that next step each time, that your feet hit the step in this order: heel-ball-toe, then push-off. Do not do this training on the balls of your feet, or with your heels hanging of the stairs as you step. This will lead to injury of your Achilles tendon(s).
    Special Cases: Big feet or no Step Mill
    Remember, there are cases when some people cannot train on a step mill, but must use something to simulate it. These limitations might be: your feet are too big for the millís steps or lack of equipment.
    In either case, I recommend a step used for aerobics or a stair at home. The step should be should be 8-9 inches high. This means you will have to step up, up, then back down off the back: down, down. Get your whole foot on the step (or on the floor) with each up and down. No heels should hang off. Going up, it will go heel-ball-toe and coming down it will go toe-ball-heel. Change your lead leg each 30 seconds of step training to avoid Achilles stress. Remember, you would count an up-up, then down-down, as one step. You must do 60 of those per minute.
    Tall Buildings:
    I do not recommend using a tall building unless itís tall enough to keep walking steadily up stairs for 6 minutes without stopping. In other words, donít choose a place where you have to walk up 2 flights, then walk back down again before you can walk back up. This will do 2 things: 1. it will give your heart rate a chance to slow, thus not training you well. 2. Walking down stairs is not good for your knees. Even if they are young and healthy, why do it? Especially training? You should save those knees for coming down the stairs of a burning building once you have a job- with a person in your arms!
    Step Depth and foot size on test day:
    If your feet are too large for the step mill used in the test, thatís a tough one. You should still not train on the step mill. Use the up and back down off the back method mentioned above. Two days a week after your step training, do some calf raises: start off with 2 sets and work up to 5 sets of 8. Stretch the calf, and the Achilles tendon. That is, do a calf stretch with your knee locked for 30 seconds, then with it slightly bent, foot still flat to the floor for 30 more seconds. This should prep your calves for the actual test without hurting you.
    So whatís the Plan?
    Hereís a plan for you to use. It will take you 11 (plus) weeks to get through it. Train a day on the step mill, and lift weights with your upper body on other indicated days. One thing I would avoid, though, is weight training for your traps specifically during this time. So: donít do shrugs or upright rows. The weight vest is tough enough on them. I say strongly: some people might also like to lift with their legs stepping days, but itís too much to cover here.
    This workout is longer than you will be required to do for the step mill on test day. This will make test day easier, plus make you more than ready for the additional demands of test day! For more information on what is expected on test day, read here: http://www.fireagility.com/index.php
    Make sure you warm up 5 minutes easy on the stationary bike, and stretch after wards- especially your calves!

    Weight Vest Pounds Time: minutes Steps/minute
    Day 1 10 2 60
    Day 2 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 3 15 2.5 60
    Day 4 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 5 15 3 60
    Day 6 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 7 15 3.5 60
    Day 8 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 9 20 3.5 60
    Day 10 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 11 Rest Entire Day
    Day 12 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 13 20 4 60
    Day 14 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 15 20 min . other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 16 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 17 25 4 60
    Day 18 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 19 Rest Entire Day
    Day 20 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 21 30 4 60
    Day 22 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 23 35 4 60
    Day 24 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 25 35 4.5 60
    Day 26 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 27 Rest Entire Day
    Day 28 35 4.5 60
    Day 29 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 30 35 5 60
    Day 31 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 32 40 5 60
    Day 33 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 34 20 min. other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 35 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 36 45 5 60
    Day 37 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 38 Rest Entire Day
    Day 39 45 5.5 60
    Self evaluation: How do I feel? Neck? Knees? Back?
    Day 40 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 41 45 6 60
    Day 42 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 43 20 min. other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 44 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 45 50 5.5 60
    Day 46 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 47 20 min. other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 48 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 49 50 6 60
    Day 50 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 51 55 5.5 60
    Day 52 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 53 Rest Entire Day
    Day 54 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Self Evaluation: How do I feel? Back? Neck? Knees?
    Day 55 55 6 60
    Day 56 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 57 20 min. other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 58 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 59 60 5.5 60
    Day 60 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 61 60 6 60
    Day 62 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 63 Rest Entire Day
    Day 64 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 65 65 5.5 60
    Day 66 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 67 Rest Entire Day
    Day 68 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Self Evaluation: How do I feel? Back? Neck? Knees?
    Day 69 65 6 60
    Day 70 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 71 20 min. other Form of cardio Run, swim, bike
    Day 72 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 73 70 5.5 60
    Day 74 Rest Entire Day
    Day 75 70 6 60
    Day 76 Upper Body Upper Body Upper Body
    Day 77 Rest Entire Day
    Day 78 75 5.5 60
    Day 79 Rest Entire Day
    Day 80 75 6 60


    From here forward, you should be able to be step mill ready if you do the last workout twice a week!

    Best of Luck!

    Dr. Jen
    www.fireagility.com
    Last edited by Drjmilus; 02-21-2008 at 10:30 AM.

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    edit:deleted post
    Last edited by Irish6019; 01-22-2008 at 06:24 PM.

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    be careful not to hurt yourself over training. Don't get me wrong you should prepare, but the CPAT is fairly easy for someone in mediocre shape. Most of it technique. Once you are through the stair climb (the only portion that can be called difficult) the thing that will get you a failure are technical mistakes. (again assuming you are in medicore shape)


    Just be cautious, don't go out looking to become an ironman and injure yourself. Practice technique!!! know what gets you DQ'd, know the test inside and out so even when you're nervous you don't make stupid mistakes.

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    Default Here ya go

    Here is a workout I put together for the Redmond IAFF Symposium. I would add some lower body stretching on the lifting days. GRADUALLY add weight to the vest after a few weeks of stairmaster work.

    http://www.foodfit.com/iaff/default_issue20.asp

  9. #9
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    Like the aforementioned, do the stair master or climb stairs as much as possible with the weight vest. That helped me the most. The weight vest was a God send.

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    Exclamation

    Just a quick caveat. Be careful how hard you go at it with the weight vest in the beginning. I, along with a few friends that are also testing developed an inguinal hernia from kicking *** with too much weight too quickly. Know your body's limits. It is better to do it right than to take yourself out of the game.

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    The above responses have been excellent. For additional ideas, check out my post on pg 14, #261 on the fairfax thread under hiring and employment. I'm 6'3", and weigh 220 lbs, so the weight vest plus the added weight wasn't as much of a burden as it may be for someone smaller. Good luck, keep us posted on your progress!

  12. #12
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    Most important tip ever:
    FIND OUT IF THE CPAT IS THE CPAT!!!!!!!!
    Alot of people call a physical agility test the CPAT, when in actuallity it is an entrance test.
    Ask the dept for specifics as to wha tthe test is- most depts will have printed info, or a website, that spells it out exactly.

    Kinda silly to practice for the wrong thing...

  13. #13
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    Default Weight vest work

    As mentioned above also: Be very careful with weight vest use. I know of a kid who completely ruined his back doing too much too soon. STart out light, and work up slowly. This will give vertebrae, muscles, ligaments and disks to lie down extra tissue to strengthen and prevent injury. If you leave it until the last minute, and jump into a heavy-weighted vest, you could really injur yourself!!!

    Good point, above, flipper!

    Dr. jen
    Last edited by Drjmilus; 02-21-2008 at 10:33 AM. Reason: forgot something...

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    Default This actually worked for me

    My cousin, who is a firefighter, took me to the track every day when he didn't work. We developed a routine that helped me crush the stairs:

    1st week: Walk around the track with the vest on two miles.
    2nd week: Fast paced walked followed by 5 sets on bleacher set stairs
    3rd week: sprint 2 times, fast paced walk 2 times 12 sets on the stairs...Repeat twice
    4th week: sprint 4 times jog 4 times 12 sets on the stairs repeat 3 times
    We did this routine for about 2 months before the test.

    I will tell you, that I was horrible with the stairs at first, but then after that, it helped me out and I maged to breeze through that section.

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    Default I walked up the down escalator at the mall with a bookbag.

    Seriously. This other girl and I went to the mall on Monday and Thursday in the morning before the stores opened. We wore backpacks full of books and walked up the down escalator. Her cousin's friend was a security guard there and he made sure the escalator was turned on. We weren't very scientific about it, we didn't even time it at first, we just did it as long as we could, then walked around slowly until we recovered enough to do it some more.

    This probably doesn't apply to you but I also gained 15 lbs before the test. I was a ballerina before I was a firefighter and every firefighter we got advice from told me to gain some weight. I actually think that helped me more than anything else. Gotta have some leverage!

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    If you can get off the stair master without blue lips and jell-o legs, you've got it made.Count your steps. 60 steps/min, so when they tell you to start after your warmup, start counting. Don't focus on your breathing or you'll do it wrong.

    Do squats and over head exercises. Squat and presses would be great. Do them in sets of high reps (12-14). High reps for endurance and muscle stamina. You can't beat old fashioned stair running and hills. Id recommend that if you plan to RUN, use less weight. Throw some weight in a backpack (40 pounds or so depending on your body mass). Or use the 75lb vest and walk stairs. The CPAT simulates 6 flights, so do 10-12.

    A simple workout for all this would be do some burpees, lunges, squat/press, and stairs. Don't let the CPAT psych you out. If your physically active you'll do just fine. Plus, test day adrenaline kicks in and gives a lot. Just don't quit. You bust your hump for up to 10:20 for a lifetime opportunity. You can rest on the couch while you wait for your phone to ring...

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    Don't ever sit and wait for your phone to ring. DON'T SIT and DON'T wait. Go apply to another department, and another, and another... until you are made an offer and you have accepted.
    Dr. Jen
    www.fireagility.com

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    Dr J is correct... don't literally set around. Be productive. I only used that as a figure of speech. If you begin to struggle, get past that mental block as in the fire service you'll hit points of exhausted, but then that alarm goes off again and you've got to dig deep and find that extra energy. You can rest another day, but the day of your test use EVERYTHING you got...

    Plus the test is just pass/fail, but if you do it in 10:50 seconds, and another person does it in 7:30, that's going to look favorably. And when your done, don't act like your completely exhaust, walk around and keep your composure that it wasn't hard. Just don't be a hot-shot like some try to be on the day of the test. Because let's face it...no one likes that guy...

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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyT373 View Post
    Plus the test is just pass/fail, but if you do it in 10:50 seconds, and another person does it in 7:30, that's going to look favorably. And when your done, don't act like your completely exhaust, walk around and keep your composure that it wasn't hard. Just don't be a hot-shot like some try to be on the day of the test. Because let's face it...no one likes that guy...
    I'd say the 10:50 time would be unfavorable too since it's a failing time. 10:20 is the time to beat, but I assume you just mistyped it cuz you had it correct in your prior posting. Just wanted the OP to be clear on the time.

    Oh, and don't be the guy that throws up at the end pass or fail either. That really doesn't look good, smell good and then the career guys have to wash down your mess. You'll be memorable, but not in the way you want.

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    yes, I had a brain flatulent... I meant to type 10:15 haha.

    You're definitely right, don't be THAT guy. Whenever your done you want all observers to being saying "daaayyyyyuuuuummmmmm" and not from your stinch. Which brings my to my next point... plenty of carbs, no sugars, lots of WATER. Don't drink gatorade or other sports drinks right after. If you do, it'll be coming out your nose before the days end...

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    Quote Originally Posted by firecat67 View Post
    Seriously. This other girl and I went to the mall on Monday and Thursday in the morning before the stores opened. We wore backpacks full of books and walked up the down escalator. Her cousin's friend was a security guard there and he made sure the escalator was turned on. We weren't very scientific about it, we didn't even time it at first, we just did it as long as we could, then walked around slowly until we recovered enough to do it some more.

    This probably doesn't apply to you but I also gained 15 lbs before the test. I was a ballerina before I was a firefighter and every firefighter we got advice from told me to gain some weight. I actually think that helped me more than anything else. Gotta have some leverage!
    Seriously, you guys are responding to a thread from Feb 2008.
    Do you think they still need the CPAT emergency advice?

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