1. #1

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    Default interview guestion help

    hello, i`m about to have my 1`st interview with my local fire department in florida, wondering if anybody knows what i should study up on, i have a job as a emt with a private ambulance company, but just wondering what kind of questions they put out there, anybody remember what they were asked?? or what if any things they had to do, i heard i might have to put a traction splint on or show them how to use a extinghuisher, not sure but could use some tips!!! this 45 minutes is what i have been working for over the last 2 years, and i want to go in ready !! thanks

  2. #2
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boozeesurfs View Post
    hello, i`m about to have my 1`st interview with my local fire department in florida, wondering if anybody knows what i should study up on, i have a job as a emt with a private ambulance company, but just wondering what kind of questions they put out there, anybody remember what they were asked?? or what if any things they had to do, i heard i might have to put a traction splint on or show them how to use a extinghuisher, not sure but could use some tips!!! this 45 minutes is what i have been working for over the last 2 years, and i want to go in ready !! thanks

    I don't know what department you have applied for, but most departments have at least 3 separate stages to the hiring process-

    Written testing- Some departments require a civil service exam (which usually has nothing to do with firefighting) and have a fire academy if hired, while others have a firefighter test, centered on operating fire apparatus, using fire tools, and firefighting operations. When this step is 'passed' you move on to the physical stage.

    Physical testing- Some departments use the CPAT (Candidate Physical Ability Test) in which you have to wear a weighted vest and perform various firefighting activities such as carrying hose up stairs and striking a metal plate with a hammer 50 times. Other places have their own test, I had to climb the 100' ladder at 70 degrees, do a hose drag at 200PSI on fog, do a dummy drag, ladder carry and raise and lower a roll of 2.5" hose 4 times from a second story without the rope slipping.

    Interview- If you make it past those two you usually are granted an interview. Interviews aren't only about the questions and answers, it shows the interviewers your confidence, knowledge, and desire to get the job. Chances are you won't have to operate a splint or fire extinguisher during this phase. My best tip- be confident, give the best answers you can, don't trash talk any former employers, and WEAR A SUIT. Or at least a dress shirt and tie.

    You can pick up firefighter exam books and interview help books at most book stores. usually Borders carries them.

    Good luck.

    EDIT: Forgot to mention, there will most likely be an extensive background check, and maybe even a polygraph test. Like I said, it depends on where you applied. Usually this information is listed on the department or city's website.
    Engineer, Local 3038

  3. #3
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    Default Oral

    I believe there are only about 30 oral board questions. Plus or minus a couple. But these 30 can be disguised into hundreds of different questions.

    Here is a simple way to break a disguised question down. Dissect the question down to its simplest term, one word, of what the question is really about. Once you have removed the disguise, you can place it in one of the 30 plus oral board questions you already have answers for. This is one of the simple tools we have to uncomplicate the oral board process.

    Here is the list of the "Thirty Plus Oral Board Questions":

    Thirty-Plus Basic Oral
    Board Questions

    1. Tell us about yourself.
    2. Why do you want to be a firefighter? When did you decide on this career?
    3. What is the job of a firefighter? Are you qualified?
    4. What have you done to prepare for this position?
    5. What are you bringing to the job?
    6. Why do you want to work for this city or agency?
    7. What do you know about his city or agency?
    8. What do you like to do? What are your hobbies?
    9. What are your strengths? Weaknesses?
    10. What would your employer say about you?
    11. What are the attributes of a firefighter? What is the most important one to you?
    How Would You Handle the Following Scenarios?
    12. Drinking or drugs on the job? 13. Stealing on the job? 14. Conflict with another employee?
    15. Irate citizen? 16. An employee crisis at an emergency? 17. Sexual harassment?
    18. Racial situation? 19. Conflicting orders at an emergency? 20. An order that could place you in great danger or be morally wrong?
    21. What do you say when you don't know an answer to a question?
    22. Are you on any other hiring lists? What would you do if another city called you?
    23. When can you start if we offered you the job?
    24. How far do you want to go in the fire service? Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
    25. What are the quality traits of a firefighter? Which one is the most important to you?
    26. Have you ever been in an emergency situation? Tell us what you did?
    27. What word would best describes you in a positive way? A negative way?
    28. How do you handle conflict?
    29. Why would we select you over the other candidates?
    30. Do you have anything to add?

    These questions can be disguised in hundreds of different ways. It's your job to take off the disguise and find the real question and have a "Nugget" answer to satisfy the oral board, get your best score on the answer and cause the board to go onto the next question.

    So what tools can you use to practice and rehearse your oral board answers? A mirror is a start, since you need to see how you look during an interview. A video camera is better because you need to hear what you are saying, but is limiting in that you are confined to sitting in front of it. The best tool to practice your speech is a handheld audio recorder that can go anywhere you do.

    The majority of candidates fail to see the merit of taking the time to record and listen to their speaking tendencies. It’s unfortunate, because you are competing against those who know the value of clear and effective speaking, and they are the ones landing the competitive jobs.

    I realize that listening to your own voice can be an uncomfortable experience. What is the first thing a candidate says when he hears his voice on a tape recorder?

    “Oh, that can’t be me. I don’t sound like that.”

    Once you get past this revelation, there are a few key points to consider when trying to listen and learn from your speech:
    ·Be aware of the timing of your response and the pace at which you answer questions and transition between sentences
    ·Notice the inflection — or pitch — of your voice. Avoid speaking too loudly or too softly.
    ·Monitor the volume of your speech.
    ·Pay attention to what you are saying as well.
    ·Be concise; cut out unnecessary ramblings and reduce those nervous “pause fillers.”

    You need to hear what the oral board is going to hear in order to succeed at the interviewing process.

    Once you’ve practiced the audio qualities of your speech, it’s time to focus on the content. Most people think that they can write down their answers to interview questions and magically regurgitate them during the oral board. Trust me, the brain and mouth don't usually work that way.

    Try taking 3x5 cards and writing down your oral board questions on them. Practice your answers with a tape recorder and play it back. Each time you dislike your response to a question, write it down on that 3x5 card. The next time you go after that question, turn over the card first to see what mistake you don't want to repeat.

    Some people will argue that over-practicing will make your responses sound canned. I say that your responses will sound planned. Practice makes permanent.
    _____________________________________________

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob"

    www.eatstress.com

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