View Poll Results: Do you see any use for the IFEX3000 Gun

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  • As a primary interior attack tool

    5 17.24%
  • As an exterior tool for car fires

    5 17.24%
  • As an exterior tool just for grass and brush fires

    4 13.79%
  • As a tool for other situations (Describe)

    6 20.69%
  • I do NOT see any use for this tool whatsoever

    12 41.38%
Multiple Choice Poll.
  1. #1
    EuroFirefighter
    Batt18's Avatar
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    Default Rapid Response Fire Attack

    This is the IFEX3000 Rapid Fire Attack Gun - Have any of you had experience of it? Do you think it has use in the field? Possibly as a primary interior fire attack tool? Or an exterior tool for rubbish, brush, car fires? I would be interested in your views and opinions. It is a tool that is very portable and can be worn in conjunction with SCBA. (Click link above to view video)

    Specs -

    It holds 13 liters of water in a back-pack
    It fires brief bursts of water fog using compressed air
    It can only fire a small amount of water in each burst
    There is a recharge time of 1-2 seconds between each burst
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    Last edited by Batt18; 02-21-2008 at 12:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Now I can not tell from the video, is it stored in tanks around the SCBA?

    If that is the case, it is something I would consider trying in lieu of carrying the can for performing the inital search or VESing.

    I would be open to it. Having no idea about the weight of this item, I can not say for sure whether I would like it or not.

    Added PS-

    I think to be effective in lieu of the can however, that nozzle might have to be shorter.
    Co 11
    Virginia Beach FD

    Amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong. Which one are you?

    'The fire went out and nobody got hurt' is a poor excuse for a fireground critique.

  3. #3
    EuroFirefighter
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    Yes Doc - you are on the right road already Sorry to go all 'metric' on ya

    water/agent tank capacity 13 liter
    size air cylinder 2 liter
    overall width x depth x height 360 mm x 260 mm x 625 mm
    weight, empty / overall weight 10.3 kg / 23.3 kg
    material cylinder stainless steel 1.4301-SS304
    harness material flame resistant synthetic
    filler cap unit / handle brass / chrome plated steel
    release valve manual valve; 6,3 bar
    water and air hoses snap on connections
    water inlet filter optional, mesh size 0.6 mm
    operating / test pressure 6 bar / 7.8 bar
    recommended additive concentration 0.5 to 1.0 %

    Still viable?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Batt18 View Post
    weight, empty / overall weight 10.3 kg / 23.3 kg

    Eh. At almost 52 pounds full, plus at least a 22lb 30min SCBA, plus the gear. That is a real stretch. I've already had back surgery once

    Honestly? This is the Navy Engineer in me talking. If they can switch the stainless steel tank (ie- weighs a metric ton) to either carbon fiber wrapping or aluminum, you might be able to save quite abit on full weight and get more people open to try it.

    But I would have to argue that it will be difficult to move quickly and rapidly with 52 pounds added to our already taxed body. Air consumption would go through the roof as the muscles sucked more O2 to compensate for the added weight.
    Co 11
    Virginia Beach FD

    Amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong. Which one are you?

    'The fire went out and nobody got hurt' is a poor excuse for a fireground critique.

  5. #5
    EuroFirefighter
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    Good points Doc.

    I do know that the US Navy are looking at this suppression tool that also comes in a wide range of delivery formats from the back-pack to helicopters.



    Maybe the weight of the back-pack (51 lbs) can be reduced by design. The weight of an extinguisher (can) to carry is 33 lbs so there is till a weight factor here. The suppression potential appears effective against room fires and may buy some vital time during the reccy. It is only a temporary quick-fix and will discharge it's entire contents in a few seconds.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Maybe there still is an interest in a discussion. I have used that system in Germany since about 5 years. I think it is a very good system. We used a hose reel attached to our tank on the truck. That reduces the weight drastically so you only carry the gun and can use your air pack. I don't see that system as an independent system but as a good system for the prior attack. I would put it on a brush truck for brush fires and car fires. Even on a house fire you can attack the fire from the outside with that system to reduce the temperature inside for the crews attacking inside the house. Of course that system is expensive so it might only be a system for fire departments that have a lot of car / brush fires.
    english is my second language so I hope it is understandable

  7. #7
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    Default

    It seems to be a great tool for small to medium fires. But large scale interior...meh I just can't see it.
    "Courage is the resistance to fear, the mastery of fear, not the lack of fear." Mark Twain
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." Uknown

  8. #8
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    Default John Beam

    Reminds me of the old days of the John Beam HP booster lines. If I remember correctly.. 7 gpm @ 900 psi. You could darken at lot of fire, but don't depend on complete extinquishment. We always pulled at least a cisco load ( 2.5 wyed to two 150' 1.5) for SFR or other small buildings.

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