1. #1
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    Default Help opening the hood, Res-Q-Jack saw?

    In my experience, I see alot of time & energy spent trying to open a hood of a vehicle that can't be opened by use of the factory latch. In numerous videos, I see this problem isn't limited to our department or my previous experience.
    I recently viewed a pitch from a product called Res-Q-Jack saw, that seems to make easy work of this issue, but obviously with significant collateral damage. Here is a video of the saw in action.
    http://www.res-q-jack.com/Rescue-Saw/
    Anyone have first hand experience using this $900 saw?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hinesfire View Post
    In my experience, I see alot of time & energy spent trying to open a hood of a vehicle that can't be opened by use of the factory latch. In numerous videos, I see this problem isn't limited to our department or my previous experience.
    I recently viewed a pitch from a product called Res-Q-Jack saw, that seems to make easy work of this issue, but obviously with significant collateral damage. Here is a video of the saw in action.
    http://www.res-q-jack.com/Rescue-Saw/
    Anyone have first hand experience using this $900 saw?
    We demoed it about a year ago. Cut up 3 cars. It was amazingly fast and it really doesn't generate more sparks than our reciprocating saws do.

    It performed best when the car was only mildly deformed, severely mangled was a problem because it didn't have enough depth of cut.

    It is on our wish list, but hasn't made it into the budget yet. Although, very similar saws with similar capabilities are available at your local hardware store. The metal fabricating industry discovered circular saws a few years ago. Milwaukee makes a pretty good one.

    The nice thing about the Res-Q-Jack saw was it used a 9" blade and the others we looked at were 7 1/4" (gives a deeper cut)

  3. #3
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    There are several brands of metal cutting circular saws, both 7 1/4" and 9", that are a lot cheaper than $900. We have used the cheaper brands at a couple of schools, including a school bus extrication class, and they work great.

    They cut faster than a recip saw, but a recip saw is still needed to finish some cuts. A great tool that every department should own or have access to. A neighboring deparrtment has both a 7 1/4" and a 9" and I am lobbying for at least one of the saws but we have to pay off a loan on a truck before we can purchase any new "extra" equipment according to our board.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.

    Brad

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    we've got one as well. regarding price, i think once you add up the saw, case and the 5 steel cutting extrication blades that are included you'll find its a pretty good deal. i think blades are about $80 each. thing works great - in the right hands ! as obvious as this sounds, you have to cut in straight lines. If you try to bend around the corner of a roof post its going to bind but if you hold the line no problem. also need to keep weight of cut items off blade. if you are cutting out an access panel on a side resting bus, trailer, or car roof - make your lowest cuts first so that the weight of the panel won't pinch the blade. if you have trouble using a wood circular saw, you'll have trouble here as well. once you get the hang of this, you'll find that its a tough to beat tool for buses, trailers, wide c-posts, overhead steel doors, etc.... we chose this model for its depth. it was deepest cut we could find. we noticed that the cut edge it leaves is quite smooth to the touch not nearly as sharp as edge left by sawzall blade but don't recommend testing it too much. its got a lot of bells and whistles you don't need. I suggest you locktight all the adjustment screws that you don't need like angle cut etc.. also we took the batteries right out of the laser guide light and taped the compartment shut. make sure you have about 2k watts to drive it. if you under-power, it won't perform. its designed to come into the edge of plate steel so put some friction tape or on the bottom front edge of the blade guard if you want to make plunge cuts. i agree with kd7fds regarding cutting majorly deformed stuff that may be best cut with another tool, but the many applications where this tool performs best justifies its place in our "toolbox".

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