1. #1
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    Question Simple Hydrant Hose Question

    Our truck has a 2000' 5" on the back. When hitting the hydrant, what is the minimum distance the truck must be from the hydrant? I would imagine pretty far so the hose has room to charge safely.

    I know this is a probably a simple question, but I am still new and learning.

    Thanks!

    (I am new to a dept (more rural) and with this hose length. With my old dept (sub/urban), our trucks had only a 100' 5," so not use to this length).

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    I guess I don't understand the question. Our engines will pull within 10 feet of the hydrant if it's convenient.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikie333 View Post
    Our truck has a 2000' 5" on the back.
    Good God!!
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    See that hydrant about half a milf away, I want that one for water...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikie333 View Post
    Our truck has a 2000' 5" on the back. When hitting the hydrant, what is the minimum distance the truck must be from the hydrant? I would imagine pretty far so the hose has room to charge safely.

    I know this is a probably a simple question, but I am still new and learning.

    Thanks!

    (I am new to a dept (more rural) and with this hose length. With my old dept (sub/urban), our trucks had only a 100' 5," so not use to this length).
    The amount of hose in the bed has less to do with it than the lengths of the individual sections. Each length (coupling to coupling) is usually 50', but some dept's use 100' lengths.

    Like ChicagoFF said, you can pull within 10' and then just make a big loop with the supply line.

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    Engine should pull slightly past the hydrant and as close to the curb line as possible. When the engine leads off the hose should flake out of the bed approx. on the same line as the first section on the ground.

    We also use the 1000/1000 rule which means if the hose lay is going to exceed 1000' or you will be flowing >1000 gpm than you need to have a engine at the hydrant.

    BTW we carry 1000' of 5" (100ft sections) and 800' of 3" (7-100" sections and 2-50' sections)

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    Quote Originally Posted by AFDFS24C View Post
    Engine should pull slightly past the hydrant and as close to the curb line as possible.
    Our engine placement depends on the needs of the fire and conditions, not on the location of the hydrant.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

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    I may be reading WAY to much into your question........but you do realize you dont have to use all 2000 feet of hose every time right??? The way you asked the question made it sound like you thought this...just want to clarify??

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Our engine placement depends on the needs of the fire and conditions, not on the location of the hydrant.

    I looked in the the other hydrant thread and noticed that you'll catch your own hydrant. What's your common practice if your laying in? Do you lay to a manifold or directly to the intake?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AFDFS24C View Post
    I looked in the the other hydrant thread and noticed that you'll catch your own hydrant. What's your common practice if your laying in? Do you lay to a manifold or directly to the intake?
    Uhhh....Time to show my ignorance...What do you mean by "laying in"? "Manifold"? I'm not real hip to standard lingo...
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Uhhh....Time to show my ignorance...What do you mean by "laying in"? "Manifold"? I'm not real hip to standard lingo...
    No problem. The book term is forward lay and and our manifold is an appliance that has 1 LDH inlet and 1 LDH outlet along with 4-medium diameter outlets. They all have storz connections. If I'm not clear let me know and I'll give some more info.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AFDFS24C View Post
    No problem. The book term is forward lay and and our manifold is an appliance that has 1 LDH inlet and 1 LDH outlet along with 4-medium diameter outlets. They all have storz connections. If I'm not clear let me know and I'll give some more info.
    Uh, still no help... Heres our proceedure - you tell me what it is! Our first engine pulls just past the fire, first truck pulls in behind them to take the front of the building. Second engine backs down on the truck. This way both engines can pull forward if they need to. In my area, and there are some operational differences and habits in different areas of the city, the engines usually stay put and the hydrant man will drag hose to the hydrant. The engines here carry 150' of 4" supply on the front bumper and also 20' of soft suction to the front intake. They also carry 700' of 4" in the bed. If it's close, the engine may pull up and hook up directly with the soft suction to the hydrant - it's up to the crew as to what they do on any given fire. The 4" goes directly to the hydrant port (ports are 5" - I think). On the other port the hydrant man puts on a gate valve. This is for other companies to use as a last resort - get your own hydrant unless there is some extraordinary circumstance that dictates that you double up. It is the same for second engine, and really any others that come as well. All our supply hose is storz and there are fittings to connect to the hydrant. Does that help?
    Last edited by ChicagoFF; 03-04-2008 at 01:15 AM.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

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    Cool Our Hydrant Operation

    During this part of our Hydrant Operation we teach to spot the Engine/Truck 10-15' past the hydrant, preferably on the same side as the hydrant. The orders given, the FF motions and yells "Take it away" and then we lay our line.
    "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikie333 View Post
    Our truck has a 2000' 5" on the back. When hitting the hydrant, what is the minimum distance the truck must be from the hydrant? I would imagine pretty far so the hose has room to charge safely.

    I know this is a probably a simple question, but I am still new and learning.

    Thanks!

    (I am new to a dept (more rural) and with this hose length. With my old dept (sub/urban), our trucks had only a 100' 5," so not use to this length).
    From the way you posted your question.......................................... ................I would say 2000'
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

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    Heres a pic of a hydrant with supply line and gate valve attached. This is how they are always set up for a fire.

    http://samillerimaging.smugmug.com/g...GXNWc#61582231

    http://samillerimaging.smugmug.com/g...GXNWc#61581490
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireDawgEMT22 View Post
    See that hydrant about half a milf away, I want that one for water...
    Isn't a whole milf better than a half a milf?
    I believe them bones are me. Some say we are born into the grave. I feel so alone, gonna end up a big ol' pile a them bones

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Heres a pic of a hydrant with supply line and gate valve attached. This is how they are always set up for a fire.

    http://samillerimaging.smugmug.com/g...GXNWc#61582231

    http://samillerimaging.smugmug.com/g...GXNWc#61581490
    That's a fire hydrant?

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    A lot of people are saying that they pull past the hydrant. I guess I would stop right at the hydrant. That way when you pull of the hose and connect, you have that extra 20' or so to make the bend in the hose and prevent it crimping. Your bend will go into the street more but if we are laying a supply line then usually we have a good working fire, and hindering traffic is not a big deal at that point.

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    I wouldn't rely on where the driver stops the truck. Pull enough hose off the hose bed to reach the hydrant with sufficient slack to prevent kinks. Then motion the driver on to lay in.

    There is no minimum (sans hitting it) and there is no maximum. Dragging hose is not out of the question...

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny46 View Post
    That's a fire hydrant?
    Yep... That is a Chicago Spec Hydrant....

    http://www.firehydrant.org/pictures/chicago.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Uhhh....Time to show my ignorance...What do you mean by "laying in"? "Manifold"? I'm not real hip to standard lingo...

    Reminds me of "Backdraft".....

    "You want a second lead-out?"

    "A what?"

    "A second lead-out!"

    "What the f**k are you talking about, kid? Get out of the way!"
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    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geinandputitout View Post
    The amount of hose in the bed has less to do with it than the lengths of the individual sections. Each length (coupling to coupling) is usually 50', but some dept's use 100' lengths.

    Like ChicagoFF said, you can pull within 10' and then just make a big loop with the supply line.

    Ohh, thanks! I have yet to pull it, so I guess I wouldn't know

    Thanks for clearing that up for me

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    [QUOTE=ChicagoFF;927650]Heres a pic of a hydrant with supply line and gate valve attached. This is how they are always set up for a fire.

    Chicago FF,

    Thanks for the info. That gave me a good idea how you set it up.

    Mike

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    Mike33 --- shouldnt you be learning that at your specific department. Learn the basics for your department first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    Mike33 --- shouldnt you be learning that at your specific department. Learn the basics for your department first.
    Ya-found out today, working house fire!

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