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  1. #1
    Forum Member Squad1LT's Avatar
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    Default Reduced Call Responses

    I am helping develop a new Driver's Response Policy and was wondering what other departments do for responding to alarms. We are thinking about the following:

    Code 3: emergency
    Code 2: non-emergency. no lights, not exceeding speed limit, etc...



    CO call: Code 2
    Smell of Gas: Code 2 with Officer discretion to respond Code 3
    based on caller information.
    Supervisory Alarm: Still company Code 3, second company Code 2
    First alarm (fires): Code 3
    EMS-battery: Code 2 unless scene is secured
    Car wreck with injuries: Still company Code 3, others code 2


  2. #2
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
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    Whats the logic behind an emergency response for a supervisory alarm?
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  3. #3
    Forum Member Squad1LT's Avatar
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    Supervisor alarms get an emergency response because although most alarms are do to food on the stove or malfunctions every so often it is the real deal. So I think you would at least want the first company to respond hot to investigate if it is a fire or not.

  4. #4
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
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    A supervisory alarm? Who is connecting/programming smoke and fire detection devices to a supervisory alarm circuit?
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  5. #5
    Back In Black ChiefKN's Avatar
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    Might want to consider a CO Call as an emergency if there are persons reported to be ill.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  6. #6
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    Regarding the fire alarm and the car wreck:

    I am of the theory that if you are sending someone to these, your department is deeming it an emergency or at least potentially an emergency or you would not be sending anyone. Therefore send the entire assignment hot until proven otherwise.

    I understand the logic of a hot and cold response, I just wouldn't mix the two. Deem it either an emergency or not and send everyone the same way.
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    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  7. #7
    Forum Member TexasBaptist's Avatar
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    The way our city works is:

    ALL Fire calls are Code 3.

    ALL EMS calls are Code 3.

  8. #8
    Let's talk fire trucks! BoxAlarm187's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBaptist View Post
    The way our city works is:

    ALL Fire calls are Code 3.

    ALL EMS calls are Code 3.
    Even fractures, headaches, and diaper rashes?
    Career Fire Captain
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  9. #9
    Forum Member edge1317's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    Even fractures, headaches, and diaper rashes?
    How do you know that fracture hasn't severed an artery? The headache a brain bleed? The diaper rash in fact an allergic reaction in need of epi?

  10. #10
    Let's talk fire trucks! BoxAlarm187's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edge1317 View Post
    How do you know that fracture hasn't severed an artery? The headache a brain bleed? The diaper rash in fact an allergic reaction in need of epi?
    Effective EMD is a place to start.

    If that's the case, why don't we send a hazmat assignment to every MVA, because the "could" be leaking fuel?

    Sorry, I just don't buy the need to respond emergent to every call, fire OR EMS.
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    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  11. #11
    Forum Member edge1317's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    Effective EMD is a place to start.

    If that's the case, why don't we send a hazmat assignment to every MVA, because the "could" be leaking fuel?

    Sorry, I just don't buy the need to respond emergent to every call, fire OR EMS.
    Fair enough on the count of EMD. We don't have EMD here (that I know of).

    But, there is no use for hazmat assignment for leaking fuel where I am we're equipped to handle these things, I don't know if that's common elsewhere.

    I feel whenever we get toned out it is an emergency, therefore we should respond emergency. However, that works for you and thats great and brings a little more safety to responding. I don't feel it would work for us at the moment.

  12. #12
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
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    There are lots of things that a fire department can be sent to that are not an emergency. But we are going simply because we are the only ones equipped to handle it. A CO alarm with no symptoms is perfect example. The furnace man doesn't have multi-gas meters and PPV fans, we do. But there is no emergency situation if nobody has symptoms.

    That CO alarm with no symptoms is the only fire call type that is SOP non-emergency response and is dispatched as a non-emergency response. All other calls are defaulted to emergency until the common sense and discretion of an officer on the air says "continue non-emergency". Credible reports of an alarm being accidental for example would probably result in an officer downgrading the response.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  13. #13
    Forum Member DrewOnFire's Avatar
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    Hey Loo,

    We run a Hot, Warm, Cold response system. Hot- everyone code 3, Warm- First in unit is code 3, rest are code 1, and Cold- everyone code 1.

    Seems to work pretty well, we have an SOP and response matrix that details it. Of course everything is up to officer discretion about how he wants to handle the call.

    I'll attach or send you the SOP in file format tomorrow when I'm at work.
    Drew Lyman,
    "Dear Chief, much has happened since we talked last..."

  14. #14
    Forum Member DrewOnFire's Avatar
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    Here is our three tier response SOP.

    Hope it helps as a version of what someone has in writting. Good luck with what you choose to do.

    2401 - Three Tier Response Policy.doc
    Drew Lyman,
    "Dear Chief, much has happened since we talked last..."

  15. #15
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    Post Responses

    The dept I was on in Ct (I left in 01) was a cpmbination dept. We responded how dispatch told us on medicals. A headache we may not have been toned out for the FD. It very likely would have been an "ambulance only" call. The ambulance service was run by service which had "duty crews" during the day and at night would page for volunteers. If the ambulance was delayed we may get toned for a "cold response". Chest pains would be FD, ambulance, and medic on a "hot response". Fire alarms, crashes, and such normally were "Hot" unless we received consecutive trips. Gas spills, bomb threats, and investigations were toned out per duty cpatains orders.

    The dept I belong to in Mn goes "Hot" to all medicals, crashes, co alarms, and on fire alarms our 1st out (quint) goes "Hot". The rest either remain in quarters or respond "Cold" until an update is received. We are a small dept with 350 responses per year. We protect a city of about 3500 and have 2 contracts; one strictly rural and the other is a combination of rural and suburban. We have 4 traffic lights to deal with and all 4 have opticoms which definately makes it safer for the public as well as apparatus responding.

    Good luck with your SOP/G's!!

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber fyrmnk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squad1LT View Post
    I am helping develop a new Driver's Response Policy and was wondering what other departments do for responding to alarms. We are thinking about the following:

    Code 3: emergency
    Code 2: non-emergency. no lights, not exceeding speed limit, etc...



    CO call: Code 2
    Smell of Gas: Code 2 with Officer discretion to respond Code 3
    based on caller information.
    Supervisory Alarm: Still company Code 3, second company Code 2
    First alarm (fires): Code 3
    EMS-battery: Code 2 unless scene is secured
    Car wreck with injuries: Still company Code 3, others code 2
    We're backwards (of course), but we use Code 1 for emergency and Code 3 for non-emergency (just had to be opposite then the LEOs for some reason). Code 2 for us is closest unit emergency, other(s) non-emergency.

    Anyway, EMD is used by our dispatch and they advise a code type for the call on medicals. On fire calls, department policy and officer discretion is used for the response type but here are some of our common ones:

    Regular alarms (structure fires): All units emergency
    Modified responses (for us any call that requires between a still and a full alarm assignment, units assigned vary by call type): All units emergency
    Still alarms (single unit): Based on call type

    CO- no one ill: Still/Non-emergency
    CO- with ill- Modified
    Gas odor or leak inside- Modified
    Gas leak outside- Still/Emergency
    Gas odor investigation outside- Still/Non-emergency
    Special operations (hazmat and rescue) calls- Modified
    Automatic alarm- Still/Non-emergency (soon to change on some target hazards)
    Automatic water flow- Still/Emergency
    Extrication- Modified
    Investigations- Still/Most non-emergency, company officer discretion

    Regardless of our response mode, we still run our opticom on all runs.

    It boils down to whatever works for your particular jurisdiction, distance to travel, manpower, etc. in my opinion.
    FTM-PTB-RFB
    IACOJ

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