Thread: lie detector

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    Default lie detector

    I was wondering if anyone could post inf on experience with lie detecor's.. Good ....Bad.... Problems passing....tips... Anything really.

    Can they take your answers and judge you by the asnwer it self or are they just looking to see if you lie or not????

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by McDonaldMike45 View Post
    I was wondering if anyone could post inf on experience with lie detecor's.. Good ....Bad.... Problems passing....tips... Anything really.

    Can they take your answers and judge you by the asnwer it self or are they just looking to see if you lie or not????

    Thanks
    Above all else, tell the truth.

    It helps to understand what a polygraph is. It is a tool used by a trained polygraph operator. This tool detects involuntary physiological reactions to stimuli. The stimulli in this case are the questions.

    The polygraph is not a lie detector. It does not tell the operator when you are lying.

    It demonstrates to the operator that you had a particular reaction to a particular question that did or did not appear in other questions. When the operator sees this, he is not trained to jump up and scream that you are lying. He is trained to explain to you what he sees and to try to figure out what may be causing this reaction. Very often, the reaction is caused by something you may have forgotten to tell him. It may be caused by the way the question is worded. A good operator will give you every benefit of the doubt and every opportunity to fix the response.

    The operator should conduct a control exercise with you. One in which you intentionally lie to a question. For example, the operator will give you eight cards with a number. You will be instructed to answer in the negative when he asks you if your card contained a particular number-even the one you held. The operator will then tell you which card you had. This demonstrates to him that he it adjusted properly and demonstrates to you that it is working properly.

    One other word of warning. There are many sites on the Internet with advice on how to beat the polygraph. Some of these include inducing pain at the begnning of each answer, controlled breathing, etc. If the operator detects this, and he probably will, you are done.

    Do not be afraid to tell the truth. Everyone has made mistakes and everyone has a skeleton in the closet. If you like looking at child porn on the Internet and admit it under the guise of telling the truth, you ain't getting the job. That's not what I mean.

    Wear a suit, make a good impression and tell the truth.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    In addition to the other advice, I'd emphasize just being as relaxed and as truthful as you can. Obviously, the whole situation is stressful, but if you are tense it can screw up your results.

    I always copy my background packet, and read over it before I go to the polygraph, so I am comfortable with my answers. I mean, everything is truthful on the background to start with, but it helps me to not be nervous if I know for sure I am giving consistent answers. Sometimes the questions (before the actual polygraph) are pretty detailed, and it can make you second guess yourself.

    One other thing - at one polygraph, I was asked about deviant sexual behavior, which totally threw me for a loop and made me really uncomfortable. One question was what was the strangest sexual thing I'd ever done, or something along those lines. I'm not making that up, they actually asked. They also asked about kiddie porn, which I can see more why that would be a legitimate question. There were a couple other ones that I can't remember specifically.

    Good luck.

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    Let me add one more thing. I am 100% opposed to using the polygraph as a pre-employment screening tool. There are far more reliable ways to screen a candidate than by using a polygraph. NJ is one of 20 states that prohibits pre employment polygraphs in both the public and private sector.

    I have used the polygraph hundreds of times in my public sector days as an investigative tool. I have seen it work. However, I believe that it is a tool and should be viewed as just that. I don't believe the results should be admissable in court.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    Thanks guys.. I guess my main concern would be that of things I have done in my past when i was younger.. i am sure everyone has things they wish they havent done. I am just curious to see if they could use those answers against me. for instance Steeling. If I stole 2 dollars in 5th grade. haha . If you tell the truth to a general question... Do you get to explain it? Can they use that answer against you?

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    Most of us have dont things such as stealing candy bars and so forth, as children. The administrator may ask you a question such as "Have you ever lied to get out of trouble?". Everyone has, at some point. You could have lied to your parents, teacher, girlfriend, etc. Answering no to that question would be abnormal, and raise cause for concern. After giving an example of a lie, the administrator may ask you if there were any other times where you lied to get out of trouble, again and again until you honestly can't remember any more incidents. My opinion of the polygraph is that it is an interrogation, and the charts are tools to coax a confession. Always tell the truth, but try not to ramble on, in an attempt to justify an admission. Just answer the question, then stop speaking. During my pre-employment polygraph, I was shown a chart with the values "off the scale" in comparison to others. I was asked to explain, to give a possible reason/cause for this. I honestly didn't know, and that is what I told the detective. I left the test sick to my stomach, thinking that I failed for sure, then I received notice that I passed about one month later! My point is, if the graphs are inconsistent, and you were indeed telling the truth, sack up, tell them that you are telling the truth, that you don't know why the graph is off. Then hold your position, and remain silent. If you ramble on, it will look like you are nervous, and trying to conceal something. I dislike polygraphs, as I believe many innocent people were erroneously failed. The only apparent benefit, in my opinion, is to use the graphs and interrogation tactics to ellicit confessions from the applicant. Good luck!

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    QUOTE: NJ is one of 20 states

    What are the other 19 states?

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    Quote Originally Posted by McDonaldMike45 View Post
    Thanks guys.. I guess my main concern would be that of things I have done in my past when i was younger.. i am sure everyone has things they wish they havent done. I am just curious to see if they could use those answers against me. for instance Steeling. If I stole 2 dollars in 5th grade. haha . If you tell the truth to a general question... Do you get to explain it? Can they use that answer against you?
    That is the purpose of the pre-interview. Once you get all that stuff out in the open, the test can proceed. I have used a polygraphist who would use questions such as "Except what you have told me, have ever, even one time, done (blank)"? That way, you don't have that old stuff clogging up your psyche.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    Quote Originally Posted by edpmedic View Post
    Most of us have dont things such as stealing candy bars and so forth, as children. The administrator may ask you a question such as "Have you ever lied to get out of trouble?". Everyone has, at some point. You could have lied to your parents, teacher, girlfriend, etc. Answering no to that question would be abnormal, and raise cause for concern. After giving an example of a lie, the administrator may ask you if there were any other times where you lied to get out of trouble, again and again until you honestly can't remember any more incidents. My opinion of the polygraph is that it is an interrogation, and the charts are tools to coax a confession. Always tell the truth, but try not to ramble on, in an attempt to justify an admission. Just answer the question, then stop speaking. During my pre-employment polygraph, I was shown a chart with the values "off the scale" in comparison to others. I was asked to explain, to give a possible reason/cause for this. I honestly didn't know, and that is what I told the detective. I left the test sick to my stomach, thinking that I failed for sure, then I received notice that I passed about one month later! My point is, if the graphs are inconsistent, and you were indeed telling the truth, sack up, tell them that you are telling the truth, that you don't know why the graph is off. Then hold your position, and remain silent. If you ramble on, it will look like you are nervous, and trying to conceal something. I dislike polygraphs, as I believe many innocent people were erroneously failed. The only apparent benefit, in my opinion, is to use the graphs and interrogation tactics to ellicit confessions from the applicant. Good luck!
    The points you bring up are precisely the reason that I believe this is a poor tool to use as a pre-employment screen.

    As I said, the polygraph is a tool. It is not proof.

    There is also a difference between all your reactions being off the chart and the answers to a specific question being off the chart. If they are all off the chart, there is usually an explainable reason. If the answer to a specific question is reactive, the operator will usually discuss the problem with you, try to clear it up and then run the test again. If that answer still shows a significant reaction, you can deny all you want, that answer is going in the books as deceptive.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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