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  1. #1

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    Default Need Help with cpat

    Need help with tips and hints to pull dummy and for hose drag thanks all.


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPanic View Post
    Need help with tips and hints to pull dummy and for hose drag thanks all.
    Most people who fail the CPAT fail the first event (Stair Climb/Stair Stepper), or run out of time during the last event (Ceiling Breach). People who run out of time at the breach and pull lost a few seconds at all the prior event stations because they PAUSED to THINK of how to do the event or PAUSED or SLOWED down to catch their breath.

    Rescue: At the dummy pull, size up where the handles are before you get there. Grab them and get going. You may feel the burn in your legs but don’t stop. It saps your strength to have to get the dummy moving again each time you stop. When you reach the barrel, do not make the turn until the dummy’s knees are even with farthest side of the barrel. If you try to pull the dummy around the barrel any sooner, it takes more energy and it will take more time. Get over the line and let go of the dummy and get to the ceiling Breach and Pull.
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  3. #3
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    Search this forum for similar threads, but as has been pointed out before, the CPAT is not the same as a cpat (which is just someone's entry level test).
    Figure out which one you are taking, specifically how much the dummy weighs, does it have handles?
    How much hoseline, charged or uncharged, diameter?


    If you need advice on how to drag uncharged hoselines, I don't think anyone here can help you

    http://www.ct.gov/cfpc/lib/cfpc/CPAT...Guide_2007.pdf
    From the official CPAT site:

    Event 2 Hose Drag
    Equipment
    This event uses an uncharged fire hose with a hoseline nozzle. The hoseline is marked at 8
    feet (2.24 m) past the coupling at the nozzle to indicate the maximum amount of hose you
    are permitted to drape across your shoulder or chest. The hoseline is also marked at 50 feet
    (15.24 m) past the coupling at the nozzle to indicate the amount of hoseline that you must
    pull into a marked boundary box before completing the test.


    As for the dummy drag, get as much of the ground s you can, lean way back, wrap your arms as tight as possible, and walk backwards.
    Practice carrying the heaviest weight plate you can (ie 50kg), holding it close to your chest and walking with it. Or carry a sandbag. Or your roomate/boyfriend/whatever.
    Last edited by mitllesmertz1; 03-25-2008 at 08:16 PM.

  4. #4
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    Stair Climb:

    Problem: No matter how hard you train for the stair climb, your legs will feel like rubber when you're through. The time it takes to recover from this depends on your fitness level and your V02 Max. VO2 Max is the maximum amount of oxygen your body can process in order to feed your muscles to do work. In tests like the CPAT, if your VO2 Max is not high enough, you simply fail. Your legs may give out, or worse, you may become injured.

    Solution: Proper training, gradually pushing up the limits of your VO2 Max over time can allow your body to compensate a little bit each time. This allows your heart and lungs to get stronger each time, thus preparing you for more, harder work the next time.
    This is an event that is really easy to train for. You simply need a road-map of how much weight to use when, and a plan of how to safely increase resistance and duration. You really do need a weight vest for this. They are sold at weightvest.com. The Fire it Up System gives you this road map, with fill in the blank charts on how to progress!

    Warning! Many people train with a back pack full of sand, or by carrying a weight plate. Don't do this! It changes the biomechanics, and puts your spine at risk! It causes small amounts (micro) of injury each time you do it. These add up, and will cause you problems in the future. As you age, you are much more likely to hurt your back. These sorts of injury are often career changing, if not career ending! Use a weight vest!

    Hose Drag:

    Problem: After the Stair climber, you will be out of breath. In the heat of the moment, and the rubber legs that come with it, you can have real problems if your legs are not strong enough. As soon as you step off the stair machine, turn and face the line that takes you to the hose pull. The proctor will remove the sandbags from your shoulders. MOVE IT! Pick up the nozzle, shoulder the hose, and GO! This is not the time to have rubber legs. And you shouldn't have them if you have trained properly. Nor is it the time for your abs, your traps, or your oblique's to be weak or de-conditioned!

    Solution: Proper sport specific training can prepare you for this. MOVE! GO as fast at you can. Your quads may start to burn and you make fast, explosive movements in the proper direction -- unless you have trained them to work just like this! The drum may offer you some resistance. That's why you need to be moving at a fast pace when you round it! Step into the box, turn around, get (carefully) down on one knee, and pull the hose. Now you can catch your breath. Is your grip strong enough? Have you been training by pulling just like this? Because if you've trained properly, this will be much easier! PULL that hose hand over hand as fast as you can. For a picture, click here and scroll to event #2: http://www.fireagility.com/cpat_events.php

    The exercises (which are used in the Fire it Up Program) that apply here are: Decline Leg Press, the One Handed Rope Lat Pull, and the Over the Shoulder Pull. The road map to success, is once again clearly planned out in the Fire it Up Manual.

    Equipment Carry:

    Problem: This event is not actually that difficult, except for grip strength and prevention of back injuries from improper lifting.

    Solution: When you get to the equipment carry, you'll be glad you worked on your grip strength with spring loaded grip strengtheners. Look on Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&sear...gthener&page=1
    Just face the cabinet, and remove one saw at a time. Lift with your legs, not your low back. Pivot with your feet, not your trunk. Aren't you glad you have worked on core and trunk stabilization properly so these types of movements are safe and naturally performed by your abs, gluts, low back and oblique's? Your oblique muscles should be tight to prevent excessive rotation of your low back, and possible injury. Turn around, THEN, pick up both saws. This will ensure that both saws are touching the ground before you begin moving down the line.
    The exercises appropriate for these exercises are: Lateral Flexion on the hyperextension bench, the Bicycle abs, and grip exercises with the a hand gripper. The fill in the blank format of the manual takes you step by step toward making this event a walk in the park.

    Ladder Raise:

    Problem:
    When you arrive at the ladder raise, you'll see why the squat thrust exercise I use in training is so important. See a picture of the squat thrust on here:
    http://www.fireagility.com/cpat_events.php
    Get down, use your legs and your upper body, grab the rungs, and raise the ladder. You have to push the ladder up rung by rung as fast and you can. Good thing your deltoids are ready for this! Now move over to the fly extension and just do it. Don't hesitate!

    Solution:
    The anterior delts are heavily employed here. The Squat Thrust and the Bicep Upper Cut are key in training for this event. (shown in the Fire it Up program) Practicing the actual ladder raise is experience you can’t do without either! Keep your abs tight to protect your low back. Hold your shoulders back while standing straight to protect your mid back!

    Forcible Entry:
    This can be a very exhausting portion if you are tired, and you haven't properly trained for JUST THIS action. Catch your breath as you follow the line and pick up the sledgehammer. This should not feel heavy to you if you are properly trained. Start swinging as soon as you can in short choppy strokes. Departments may set the forced entry device at a level that fits their needs. When the alarm sounds, let go of the hammer, but don't fling it, or you're out! Move to the tunnel crawl.
    The Fire it Up System trains specifically for this event, with the cable pull/ax chop exercises. The Lateral Flexions on the hyperextension bench doesn’t hurt you here either.

    Search:
    You don’t need to scream through this one but you do need to move! This where you can lose valuable seconds! Know this event! It is actually fun as long as you aren't claustrophobic. Be aware of the obstacles inside. Otherwise you might get disoriented and confused. There are no sharp or abrupt edges. All of the edges are tapered, so as long as you keep your head down, you can really move through here. The practice sessions really come into handy here, so use them! It will remove any doubt from your mind about where the obstacles are. This event is a good time to catch your breath before the dummy drag.

    Dummy Drag:
    At the dummy drag, size up where your handles are before you get there. Once again, the practice sessions are perfect for this! Grab them quickly and get going! Your legs may begin to burn! You must have proper strength and VO2Max to get this done. Keep your abs, core and your low back tight to prevent injury here!
    Decline leg press and 1-leg ups are essential training here to have leg strength in the lower ranges of motion. Back extensions and lateral flexion (both on the hyper extension bench) are essential ingredients to protecting your low back.
    Ceiling Breach and Pull:

    This is the event where folks run out of time and fail the CPAT. Grab the pike pole and step in. Start pushing and pulling with all you've got. You’ll be relieved if you trained properly for this event. Get the rhythm/fast pace going. An object at rest requires energy to get it moving. That's inertia. Once it's moving, take advantage of momentum. If those ceiling hatches are not making lots of loud noise, you are not working hard enough.
    If you are taking this test for the first time you need to prepare. The Bicep Upper Cut and the One Armed Rope Lat Pull are essential training tools to maximize your effectiveness here.
    For more information on how to pass the CPAT and leave the other test takers in the dust, see our web site.

    Dr. Jen
    www.fireagility.com

  5. #5

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    thank you guys for all your responses taking the cpat April 10th and just wanted to know some extra hints or any thing does anyone know the layout of whats inside the search tunnel like what u encounter first second and last ?? also does any one have any tips or books or even videos for the oral interview process thats next after the cpat and just want to start studying a little for that when im not hitting the gym thanks all

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPanic View Post
    thank you guys for all your responses taking the cpat April 10th and just wanted to know some extra hints or any thing does anyone know the layout of whats inside the search tunnel like what u encounter first second and last ??
    Tunnel aka Search: Get in and get out! You may not move like a greased pig at the fair but you do need to move. One candidate wrote: Here is where I lost about 15-20 seconds. The event itself is pretty fun if you are not claustrophobic. Be aware of the obstacles inside. I could not figure one out, and I got disoriented and lost precious time figuring it out. Crawl fast as there are no abrupt edges that you’ll run into. All the walls are tapered so as long as you keep your head down you can fly through. Doing the practice “run-throughs” will take away all doubt of what and where the obstructions are in tunnel crawl.

    Always remember to stay right, and come back to your right after an obstacle. The event is shaped in a horseshoe, so there are two right turns. This can be a good time to catch your breath as well in preparation for the dummy drag.

    Quote Originally Posted by KPanic View Post
    also does any one have any tips or books or even videos for the oral interview process thats next after the cpat and just want to start studying a little for that when im not hitting the gym thanks all
    See below
    ______________________________ _______________

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob"

    www.eatstress.com

  7. #7

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    I'm not sure abuout how the CPAT is administered in your location but in Dallas we were given a information packet about the skills and exercises we should do inorder to be prepared for the CPAT. Then we had 8-12 weeks to get ready. Almost every day there were firefighters at the academy working overtime to instruct the people on how to pass the CPAT. I consider myself of above average strength and endurance and it was CHALLENGING to say the least. I wanted to feel the dummy in my hands and wear the vest to feel the weight. You should try to be as prepared as possible and practice. I'm sure you have this opportunity also. As someone posted earlier people either can't get the stairmaster or run out of time. Most of it is because they don't take the CPAT serious. Don't stop practicing. Good luck!

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