Boston FF Files Suit Against Cops

BOSTON -- A veteran Boston firefighter filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the City of Boston and two of its officers. NewsCenter 5's Liz Brunner reported that Wayne Abron, 43, and his attorneys say the officers used...


BOSTON --

A veteran Boston firefighter filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the City of Boston and two of its officers.

NewsCenter 5's Liz Brunner reported that Wayne Abron, 43, and his attorneys say the officers used excessive force when they falsely arrested and charged him last year.

"Every time I jump on that truck, I'm putting my life on the line, and this is what the city turns around and does to me?" Abron asked.

Abron is filing a civil rights suit against Brian Dunford, David Santosuosso and the city of Boston for allegedly assaulting him Easter weekend 2008 when they arrived at his Dorchester home following an anonymous 911 call.

"I remember being grabbed from behind. Next thing I know my face hits the ground. Then I wake up in the hospital and then I wake up in a cell," Abron said.

Abron suffered facial injuries and a tear in his shoulder, an injury that is now permanent. He admits him and his girlfriend at the time, Edwina Wynn, were having an argument, but says at no time did he assault her, nor police. Abron was acquitted of all charges by a six-person jury last September.

"It's one thing to have been physically abused, but it's another when they lie about it and try to cover it up," Abron said.

"Do you feel there's a cover-up?" Brunner asked.

"Absolutely there's a cover up. Absolutely. We wouldn't be here today if there's wasn't," Abron said. "They said I beat Miss Wynn. Where's her marks? (They said) I beat them up. Where are their marks? I have the pictures. All the proof is on my side. Where's theirs?"

Abron's been with Engine 7, serving the city for nearly 19 years, but now says it will take a lot for him to ever make a call to 911.

"They are there to protect and serve, not to abuse and violate," Abron said.

"You say you are traumatized by this," Brunner said.

"Still am. I just look at life differently. I'm paranoid now -- anxious when I see the police now. I was never that person," he said.

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