Earlier LODDs Added to 2005 List

The number of firefighters who died performing their duties now stands at 103 as the U.S. Fire Administration was recently notified of incidents that occurred months ago. That number also may increase as more information is received, said Mark...


The number of firefighters who died performing their duties now stands at 103 as the U.S. Fire Administration was recently notified of incidents that occurred months ago.

That number also may increase as more information is received, said Mark Whitney, a fire program specialist who keeps track of firefighter fatalities.

While many more departments are notifying the USFA about firefighter deaths thanks to online reporting, others don't which leads to delays.

To ensure every person who paid the ultimate sacrifice is properly recognized, state fire marshals offices across the nation will be asked to check their information against the USFA statistics. Notices will go out early next year, Whitney said.

The most recent fire service personnel recognized include:

Carl E. Sherman, 66, of Southington Fire Dept., in Southington, Conn. On Jan. 3, after participating in a SCBA drill, he collapsed at home and was found unresponsive. He died the following day of cardiac arrest.

Jerry W. Hooper, 61, a forestry technician with the Tennessee Division of Agriculture, was waiting for his vehicle to be serviced when he was shot and killed by the estranged spouse of a Tennessee Department of Transportation worker, who also was shot. The incident occurred Jan. 11.

Gary Jolley, 52, of Mt. Carmel Vol. Fire Co., in Flemingsburg, Ky., died June 28 of a heart attack as he returned from a call in his personal vehicle. His department had been dispatched to a possible structure fire caused by a lightning strike. They found nothing, and had returned to the station when they received a call about a man slumped over the wheel of his vehicle. Jolley was transported to the hospital and pronounced dead on arrival.