Necessity Is the Mother Of Invention

A need or problem encourages creative efforts to meet the need or solve the problem.” This saying appears in the dialogue Republic by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato and it has held true through the ages. All through the ages, because of...


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A need or problem encourages creative efforts to meet the need or solve the problem.” This saying appears in the dialogue Republic by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato and it has held true through the ages.

All through the ages, because of necessity, things were invented. For example, our ancestors wore only tunics and needed a place to put their belongings, so someone invented pockets. Another person saw wasted space in closets when clothes were hung on pegs or placed on shelves. The result is the clothes hanger. Until the 19th century, seeing-eye boys assisted blind people. Out of necessity, someone decided to train dogs to do the same task.

EMS is no different. Since man first started transporting the injured and ill to hospitals, inventions have involved to make the task easier. Instead of carrying an injured or ill person on a litter, a stretcher with wheels was invented that made the chore of moving the patient from place to place easier.

That brings us to Captain Manny Chavez, a paramedic/firefighter with the Houston Fire Department for 18 years, who has created an invention out of necessity. During Chavez’s career, he has worked two of the city’s busiest medic units (9s and 31s). These two medic units cover mostly the inner-city where the majority of people use 911 as their entry into the health care system. Most of the people in these areas are poor and generally do not seek medical care immediately. They wait, and the end result is that they get sicker and sicker. Then they call 911.

To make matters worse, many of the patients are obese. Much has been written lately about how Americans are becoming “super-sized.” Figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that 64% of U.S. adults are overweight and nearly a third are obese, or roughly 100 pounds overweight. Hospitals must buy extra-large medical equipment such as blood pressure cuffs and beds just to accommodate obese patients.

And as Murphy’s Law would have it, the “EMS Rule of Threes” applies – such patients are always on the third floor, it is 3 A.M. and they weigh over 300 pounds. Of course, there is no elevator. And, as Chavez says, “they are always in the back bedroom.”

Chavez faced many of these situations and found it impractical to try to carry an obese patient down two or three flights of stairs on a stretcher. Sometimes, he would try to strap a patient to a backboard. This also proved fruitless as the patient would eventually slide down the backboard and the medic on the bottom of the backboard always bore the brunt of the weight problem.

Chavez conjectured that there had to be a better way of taking obese patients down from the upper floors without injuring the medics or the patient. One of the methods he tried was putting the patient in a sheet or blanket. Unfortunately, the blanket or sheet would eventually rip. Next, Chavez tried putting patients into salvage covers that he could get off an engine company. This did not work, since the salvage covers were usually filthy.

Chavez and his partner, Mark Becknal, agreed they had to come up with something better. They tried using a mattress carrier. That failed. Next, they tried using a PVC fabric, similar to those found on the back of an 18-wheel truck that is carrying a heavy load. This too did not work.

Then one day, while sitting in a Taco Bell, inspiration struck Chavez and Becknal. They could not help but notice that a taco shell, although thin, held all the ingredients in place without ripping. Chavez and Becknal are not engineers, but they concluded there must be some physics behind the taco shell. They concluded that they needed an oval carrier that would bring the mass to the center while distributing the weight.

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