The Pickup Truck "Autopsy" - Part 2

Ronald E. Moore explores stabilization and hazard control procedures for responders at emergencies involving pickup trucks.


Pickup Truck "Autopsy" Checklist As discussed in Part 1, the basic philosophy of a pickup truck hands-on training session is to systematically perform as many rescue assignments on this one vehicle as possible. Upon the conclusion of the training, you'll find there won't be much of the truck...


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Optional Tasks for Additional Training

  • TASK A1: Force the hood at its hinges.
  • TASK A2: Total hood removal.
  • TASK A3: Total roof removal with windshield glass attached at the top roofline.
  • TASK A4: Stabilize the vehicle on its edge, with the driver's side down.
  • TASK A5: Move the steering column separate of the dash evolution.
  • TASK A6: Total removal of the steering column at the dashboard.
  • TASK A7: Make an opening in the undercarriage floor pan of truck while it is stabilized on its edge.
  • TASK A8: Jacking and shoring evolution to lift the vehicle.

Overall Training TASK: Using this University of Extrication information, inspect 1998 model year pickup trucks to identify the location and operation of various new technology features and determine changes necessary in your department's current vehicle rescue standard operating guidelines.

Reviewing The 1998 Model Year

We review the current "state of the art" for pickup trucks manufactured as 1998 model year vehicles. This listing indicates the new technology features of this class of vehicle and the features or equipment that will influence our fire, rescue, and medical procedures at pickup truck crash scenes. Can you think of any more?

7_98_pickup19.jpg

Ronald E. Moore, a Firehouse® contributing editor, is program director for the Fire & Emergency Television Network (FETN) and American Heat Video Productions, located in Carrollton, TX. He is available on-line at fetn1@westcott.com and looks forward to sharing additional vehicle rescue information with interested persons via the Net. Part 1 of this article was published in the June 1998 issue.