Rivers Of Mud

Larry Collins details the massive mud slide and debris flows in Malibu and Laguna, CA and how emergency personnel reacted to the disaster.


On Monday, Feb. 23 1998, fire departments and rescue agencies braced as the worst El Niño -related storm of the current season bore down on Southern California. The region was already waterlogged after a week of pounding downpours that pushed annual rainfall totals to nearly double that of the...


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On the same day, the Los Angeles County Fire Department performed 35 swiftwater rescues in its 3,000 square mile jurisdiction. A single Los Angeles County unit, Air Squad 8 (pre-deployed with a helicopter-based swiftwater rescue team aboard), supported by other fire and rescue units, performed 18 swiftwater rescues in a 24-hour period. A Los Angeles County Sheriff helicopter rescued half a dozen other people. A man was swept to his death while attempting to assist a neighbor whose car was trapped in an Arizona crossing in San Dimas Canyon. Los Angeles County fire and sheriff units spent an entire day searching for the victim, to no avail.

And in Orange County, all hell broke loose once again. Laguna Beach, which was the site of a major conflagration during the so-called Fire Storms of 1993, was among the hardest hit areas. As often happens, the storm reached a crescendo just as dozens of slides, accidents, and debris flows were occurring simultaneously. This is a familiar scenario to firefighters who work in places like Laguna Beach and Malibu. Because the slopes are pre-loaded to slide by previous storms, and because the run off tends to reach maximum force at many places at once, the number of incidents seems to blossom in a burst of activity that can quickly stretch fire and rescue resources.

Attempting to maneuver fire engines and other rescue units to the scene of a mudslide or swiftwater rescue under such conditions can be difficult and dangerous, made worse by residents trying to escape in their own vehicles, and the knowledge that escape routes for rescuers may be blocked if mudslides and debris flows occur during the course of emergency operations. Under conditions of darkness and stormy weather, helicopter flight may not be possible, so ground teams are often left to their own devices.

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Photo by Larry Collins
A mud and debris flow in the Las Flores Canyon area of Malibu, CA, which was incinerated by the 1993 Old Topanga Fire. Under major storm conditions, the boulders and mud in this photo may coalesce to become flow that can wipe out homes and people downstream.

Such was the situation that faced firefighters and lifeguards in Laguna Canyon when the storm reached its crescendo in the darkness of Feb. 23. Just before midnight, residents of Laguna Canyon were awakened by a deafening downpour as the skies opened up with the heaviest rainfall of the day. Then the electricity went dead, plunging them into darkness. In an instant, the mountain above the homes seemed to give way, sending rivers of mud crashing through the walls of apartments and houses.

People were swept from their beds, from their rooms and in some cases completely out of their homes. Others were trapped inside their homes by mud that rose nearly to the ceilings. One woman reported hearing "the mountain moving." Instinctively, she and her husband moved to their baby. The mother grabbed the infant from her crib. In an instant, a flow of mud and debris literally came through the walls of her home, flushing mother and daughter through the building. The baby was ripped from her arms and disappeared in the darkness. Still caught in the avalanche-like wave of debris, the mother could not even scream because her mouth was filled with mud. She literally had to scoop mud from her mouth with her hands in order to breath and yell for help.

When the flow subsided, the parents were buried in mud, trapped several feet apart, pinned in place by debris and remnants of the building that disintegrated around them. They could hear the baby crying, but neither was able to move toward the sound. They cried for help. Soon, the baby's crying stopped. Fortunately, neighbors rushed in from adjoining apartments to help. One man came across the silent baby completely by accident as he fumbled in the mud looking for survivors. The baby was covered in mud, and the man later described her as "a ball of mud." Firefighters cleared the baby's airway, and the infant survived. The parents were eventually freed, both suffering from hypothermia and other injuries.

Elsewhere, the situation was not so good. Two people were missing, and resources were scarce in the mountainous little neighborhood. Mudslides and debris flows were occurring in other sections of Laguna, and dispatchers were unable to keep up with the 911 calls. Firefighters were unable to get through to the main debris flow, and mutual aid was requested from the Orange County Fire Authority. Laguna Beach lifeguards committed themselves to physical rescue operations at the scene of the biggest debris flow. They accessed the site in Jeeps. Working in waist-deep mud, in a pouring rain, and equipped with wetsuits and other water rescue gear, six lifeguards made a house-to-house search.

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Photo by Larry Collins
Mud and debris literally flowing off steep slopes during a storm.

 


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Photo by Larry Collins
Moving mountains - steep slopes and unstable soil combine with rain to mobilize large sections of earth. This is the type of debris that eventually settles in canyon bottoms, and may later be mobilized in the form of mud and debris flows.