World Trade Center Is Hallowed Ground

I feel like I should have metacarpal tunnel syndrome from my constant pressing of the buttons on my remote control while changing the channels on the television since Sept.11, 2001.


I feel like I should have metacarpal tunnel syndrome from my constant pressing of the buttons on my remote control while changing the channels on the television since Sept.11, 2001. Constantly flipping between CNN, MSNBC, Fox and C-Span has become a routine ritual since that tragic day. The major...


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Just like those soldiers at Gettysburg who experienced a new form of war with the introduction or development of breech-loading rifles, repeating rifles, machine guns, breechloading artillery, electronic transfer of information across the telegraph, and the rapid transfer of troops from one part of the country to the other by rail, those at the World Trade Center are the first victims in a war that we will fight like no other in our American history.

There will be much discussion and debate in the ensuing months with what to do with the property where the World Trade Centers once stood. Some estimate it will take a year to clean up the site. This is prime real estate in Manhattan that would sell for a pretty price. The words that Lincoln used 138 years ago at Gettysburg can be repeated at the base of where the towers once stood. "The brave men (and women), living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract." Rebuild the World Trade Center - just someplace else.


Gary Ludwig, MS, EMT-P, a Firehouse® contributing editor, is the managing director of The Ludwig Group, LLC, a professional consulting firm specializing in fire and EMS issues. He retired as the chief paramedic of the St. Louis Fire Department after serving the City of St. Louis for 24 years. Ludwig has trained and lectured internationally and nationally on fire-based EMS topics. He can be reached at 314-752-1240 or via www.garyludwig.com.