From Vision to Reality

With the close of our first full year’s focus on Technical Rescue, we are proud to have been able to provide our readers with an expanded look into the various components of technical rescue operations.


With the close of our first full year’s focus on Technical Rescue, we are proud to have been able to provide our readers with an expanded look into the various components of technical rescue operations. Our two most recent podcasts reached out to the EMS side of our family. In September, I...


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With the close of our first full year’s focus on Technical Rescue, we are proud to have been able to provide our readers with an expanded look into the various components of technical rescue operations.

Our two most recent podcasts reached out to the EMS side of our family. In September, I talked with Firefighter/Paramedic Jason Dush about “Crush Syndrome & Injuries from Rescue Incidents.” “Agricultural Emergencies/Heavy Equipment Rescue” was covered in our next podcast with Firefighter/Paramedic John Hansen. Each of these sessions helped to build the bond between the Fire and EMS responders at these challenging incidents. You can listen to these shows in their entirety by going to http://www.firehouse.com/podcast/buzz-technical-rescue-bob-duemmel

This month’s Technical Rescue coverage contains the final segment of my series on the development of a technical rescue facility in upstate New York. This edition provides insight into the various props that the facility provides. We also feature Mike Daley’s article “The ‘Search’ in Urban Search and Rescue.”

As the New Year begins we will be in San Diego, CA, for the 2012 edition of Firehouse World, which is being held Feb. 19-23. Please join me on Feb. 23 at the Speaker Showcase being held on the exhibit floor, where I will present a program titled “Development of Specialized Rescue Teams: The Benefits of Resource Typing.” This program is free for everyone with a Firehouse World badge

Additional coverage in 2012 will focus on aircraft firefighting. You can look forward to informative articles from some of the most knowledgeable members from the aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) community.

Please send your questions or suggestions related to future Technical Rescue programs and coverage to bob.duemmel@firehouse.com.

This is the final installment of a three-part series about the creation of a state-of-the-art technical rescue training center – the Monroe County, NY, Public Safety Training Facility (PSTF). Part one (June 2011) described how the Monroe County fire service acquired a place to train, assembled an instructional staff and staged equipment. Part two (September 2011) detailed ways in which students put classroom instruction into action during hands-on training.

Once the dust had settled and the last trailer of equipment was on its way home, plans for the future of the training grounds began to develop. Working with the Monroe Community College (MCC) staff, decisions on potential location for the new structure as well as conceptual drawings started to dominate conversations.

The effort was guided by Marc Connolly, emergency services programs manager at MCC. He attended the initial technical rescue school proposal meeting in 2006 and ended the meeting with words of encouragement and promised they would not set the ideas aside to be forgotten. Connolly, with the assistance of other staff and instructors from the training facility, took these ideas and put them in motion.

Like many other projects of this size, many factors were considered before construction began. One primary concern was climate. With cold winters and sometimes extremely hot summer days, an interior training location was determined to be the best option. With that in mind, a 41-by-24-foot building was designed. A high ceiling was also a priority, allowing for two primary features – a four-level void-search simulator and a two-level confined-space simulator.

The void-search simulator has become the facility’s signature feature. Through the combined efforts of the MCC facilities team, a design that includes multiple sliding unions and sleeved support members within each floor was sent out for fabrication. The final product consists of a four-level simulator with three 12-by-10-foot adjustable floors. Each floor can be adjusted to any degree or angle.

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