The Important Fire Service Legal Stories of 2010

  The year 2010 has passed, leaving the fire service with a number of interesting and important cases ranging from ground-breaking U.S. Supreme Court decisions to social media nightmares that cost firefighters' their jobs. The following is a fire...


  The year 2010 has passed, leaving the fire service with a number of interesting and important cases ranging from ground-breaking U.S. Supreme Court decisions to social media nightmares that cost firefighters' their jobs. The following is a fire lawyer's assessment of the most interesting and...


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The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) has issued a special report examining the characteristics of Attic Fires in Residential Buildings. Developed by the USFA's National Fire Data Center, the report is based on 2006-to-2008 data from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS).

According to the report:

•An estimated 10,000 attic fires in residential buildings occur annually in the United States, resulting in an estimated average of 30 deaths, 125 injuries, and $477 million in property damage

•The leading cause of all attic fires is electrical malfunction (43%)

•The most common heat source is electrical arcing (37%)

•Almost all residential building attic fires are non-confined (99%) and a third of all residential building attic fires spread to involve the entire building

•Nine out of 10 residential attic fires occur in one- and two-family residential buildings

•Residential building attic fires are most prevalent in December (12%) and January (11%) and peak between the hours of 4 and 8 P.M.