The Rapid Intervention Reality of Your Department - Part 3

  Last month’s column outlined five points to consider in assessing your fire department’s true rapid intervention team (RIT) capability, using the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1407 Standard for Training Fire Service Rapid...


  Last month’s column outlined five points to consider in assessing your fire department’s true rapid intervention team (RIT) capability, using the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1407 Standard for Training Fire Service Rapid Intervention Crews. The column noted that to...


To access the remainder of this piece of premium content, you must be registered with Firehouse. Already have an account? Login

Register in seconds by connecting with your preferred Social Network.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required

The next thing that the RIT should be looking at is where the closest engine is located and what equipment is available for its use if needed. Are there extra ladders, an additional line if needed or even a master-stream device that could provide protection? In the same breath, where is the closest aerial device? Can the members of the RIT operate it if they have to? What other tools are available to use off that piece of equipment if needed?

The most important point is to be ready for the potential job at hand and help prevent that potential job from happening. Although we do not want to rely on these firefighters as the ultimate insurance policy, they are our last chance to bring one of our own home safely should the need arise. Is your department ready to meet this challenge?

RIT RESPONSIBILITIES

· Monitor radio while enroute

· Consult/review pre-plan if available

· Report to safety section officer (SSO) or incident

· commander on arrival for briefing. Ascertain:

· Location for staging (usually primary entry point)

· Confirm fireground operations and RIT radio channels

· Location of fire and volume

· Expected fire extension

· Which fire companies are operating and where?

· How long have they been operating?

· What progress have they made?

· Are sufficient resources available?

· What type of accountability system is in place?

· Conduct size-up

· Identify building construction and features

· Locate all doors and windows removing any barriers

· Establish access to sides or rear of building

· Establish second way off of roof

· Raise additional ladders

· Look for signs of collapse

· Report findings and actions to SSO

· Monitor fireground radio for signs of trouble and progress

· Survey closest engine

· Size and amount of hose available

· Master stream devices available

· Portable ladders available

· Survey closest ladder truck

· Ensure crew can operate aerial apparatus

· Portable ladders available

· Specialized equipment

Ensure EMS is available and establish communications with them