Innovative Rigs on the Street: Fuller Road’s Engine 412

The Town of Colonie, NY, is protected by 12 fire departments that operate as separate volunteer organizations and are coordinated through a town emergency services committee. For a number of years, these departments have worked together on numerous...


The Town of Colonie, NY, is protected by 12 fire departments that operate as separate volunteer organizations and are coordinated through a town emergency services committee. For a number of years, these departments have worked together on numerous initiatives including joint purchasing and training groups. In addition, all areas of the town are covered by a phantom box-alarm system to provide adequate apparatus and staffing resources to each of the fire companies’ first-due areas. The Town of Colonie comprises some 58 squares miles with a population of more than 80,000. The area is adjacent to the state capital of Albany and is home to the Albany County Airport and numerous commercial, industrial and institutional properties.

The Fuller Road Fire Department was organized in October 1926 and protects the southeastern portion of the town. The first-due area is heavily developed with the Colonie Center Mall together with numerous industrial properties and shopping areas. During 2010, the station responded to 437 fire and 325 EMS calls under the direction of Chief Larry Allen. In addition to running in their first-due area, Fuller Road regularly responds to incidents with the Colonie Village, Midway, Shaker Road-Loudonville and West Albany fire companies.

Over the years, the department has operated with several Mack engines, including a classic 1958 B model 750 gpm pumper, which has been restored and is now used for parades and community-relations events. Current apparatus include: Engine 410, a 1993 Pemfab/Saulsbury 2,000 gpm pumper; Rescue 3, a 2000 American LaFrance/RD Murray 1,500 gpm rescue engine; and Truck 3, a 2009 Sutphen 100-foot aerial tower. Truck 3 is the third Sutphen tower operated by Fuller Road over the years. Their first Sutphen tower was placed into service in 1972 and was replaced in 1991 with a four-door cab, 95-foot tower equipped with a 2,000 gpm pump and 300-gallon water tank.

Apparatus Specing Process

When the department set out to develop specifications for a new pumper, an apparatus committee was formed. Over a period of several months, they interviewed a number of manufacturer’s representatives and traveled to see many new apparatus deliveries. After the bidding process, the department chose to award the contract for the new Engine 412 to the Sutphen Corporation. After many meeting with Sutphen representative Phil Vander Molen, the committee was able to refine the design for the apparatus, which resulted in the delivery of a new Sutphen Monarch pumper in 2009.

Cab And Power Systems

Engine 412 is built on a wheelbase of 215 inches with an overall length of 33 feet. The overall height at the rear of the body is just 109 inches and with the light tower mounted on top of the cab roof; the overall vehicle height is 128 inches. The aluminum cab provides seating for eight personnel with seven seats equipped with self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBAs). For enhanced safety, a Firecom headset intercom is provided for the cab seats and each SCBA seat is equipped with a Bostrom SecurAll hands-free bracket. The inside of each cab door is protected by reflective chevron stripping and Whelen TIR blue color LED warning lights.

The apparatus is equipped with a Meritor MFS front axle rated at 22,000 pounds together with a 27,000 pound rated rear axle, equipped with a Hendrickson air-ride suspension. Braking is provided by EX225 disc brakes on the front and S-cam 16.5 x 7-inch brakes on the rear with a Jacobs engine brake for auxiliary braking capability. The engine is powered by a Cummins ISM engine rated at 450 horsepower with an Allison EVS-4000 automatic transmission. Due to the extreme winter-weather conditions, a stainless-steel fuel tank was provided to reduce corrosion for this component and the chassis frame rails and components were finish painted to match the primary cab color.

Body And Pump Features

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