Firefighter Rescue: Rapid Removal Through a Window

When it comes to rapid egress or removing a downed firefighter, the most appropriate action to take due to conditions may be to use a window in the immediate area. A task such as this can be challenging if it is not trained on or practiced regularly...


When it comes to rapid egress or removing a downed firefighter, the most appropriate action to take due to conditions may be to use a window in the immediate area. A task such as this can be challenging if it is not trained on or practiced regularly. This article focuses on firefighter removal...


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If this maneuver is required to be performed from an upper-floor window, it is recommended that it take place with two rescuers on two ladders next to each other. This also reinforces the importance of the exterior firefighters being familiar and comfortable with performing removals down ladders.

"Fulcrum" Technique

The "Fulcrum" technique is limited to ground-floor or flat-surface conditions on which the exterior rescuers are based. This technique is not recommended when removing firefighters from an upper floor due to the amount of space that is required outside of the window as well as the stability of the area for exterior rescuers. The big advantage to this technique is that it can be useful in confined areas when only one rescuer may be able to enter the space around the window opening.

The "Fulcrum" technique can be applied to any ground-level window removal of a downed firefighter:

  1. The first rescuer enters the window head first. If the confined area allows, a second rescuer enters to assist the first.
  2. Once the first rescuer has positioned the downed firefighter, he applies a sling or loop of material to the downed firefighter (photo 9). Another option is to perform an SCBA harness conversion on the downed firefighter and grab from the SCBA shoulder straps if necessary.
  3. The first rescuer grabs the downed firefighter's SCBA shoulder straps and leans backward, moving the downed firefighter into a sitting position. This creates enough space for a backboard or ladder to be used as a fulcrum. One end is placed under the victim's buttocks while the other end rests on the windowsill.
  4. The rescuer on the interior places the victim on the board using the sling or SCBA harness conversion with help from the outside rescuers. To help accomplish this, the exterior rescuers can reach in and grab the sling or loop found at the head of the downed firefighter above the SCBA cylinder (photo 10) If the rescuers are using a SCBA harness conversion, they will grab the upper shoulder straps of the downed firefighter's SCBA. If the exterior rescuers are unable to reach them, an additional short piece of rope or webbing with a carabiner can be used to pull the downed firefighter onto the board or ladder.
  5. The victim is positioned on the board or ladder rotated slightly to one side due to the SCBA. The exterior rescuers hold the sling or SCBA shoulder straps with tension. The interior rescuers raise the bottom of the board or ladder until it is parallel with the floor. The exterior rescuers apply pressure to the board in a downward motion to assist in raising the downed firefighter and board (photo 11). It will also be the responsibility of the exterior rescuers to maintain the firefighter's position on the board or ladder and prevent him from sliding off as the board or ladder is moved through the window (photo 12).
  6. The exterior RIT grabs each side of the board or ladder as it exits the window (photo 13). Once clear of the window, the downed firefighter can be treated by EMS personnel.

Conclusion

It is important for firefighters to remember that the "Denver" and "Fulcrum" techniques can be applied to all situations involving window exits and any other types of openings, not only those with confined or restricted spaces. Today's fireground hazards and limited staffing make the challenge of our jobs increasingly harder each day. Rescuing one of our own in a situation that requires a removal through a window will require us to be at our best. Are you and your crew prepared to meet the challenge?

JEFFREY PINDELSKI, a Firehouse.com contributing editor, is a 20-year veteran of the fire service and deputy chief of operations with the Downers Grove, IL, Fire Department. He is a staff instructor at the College of Du Page and has been involved with the design of several training programs dedicated to firefighter safety and survival. Pindelski is a co-author of the text Rapid Intervention Company Operations and a revising author of the Firefighter's Handbook, third edition. He may be contacted at firelt226@aol.com.

 

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