Vehicular Rescue Involving Animals

Vehicular Rescue Involving Animals

Session Reference: 1

Time Required: Three to Six Hours

Materials:

   • Animal Transport Vehicles

   • Animals

   • Vehicular Extrication Tools and Equipment

   • (Optional)

References:

   • Rescue Technician: Operational Readiness for Rescue Providers, Mosby

   • Principles Of Extrication, IFSTA

   • "Horse Sense" Helps Horses, MFRI Bulletin, September 1992

   • Training Rescue Officials for The Rescue, The Quarter Horse Journal, October 1993

   • All Calls Great and Small, 9-1-1 Magazine, January/February 2000

 

PREPARATION:

Motivation:

Objective (SPO): 1-1

The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of the various techniques used to rescue that is entrapped as the result of a motor vehicle accident.

Overview:

Vehicular Rescue Involving Animals

   • Assessment

   • Hazard Control

   • Support Operations

   • Gaining Access

   • Emergency Care

   • Disentanglement

   • Removal and Transfer

   • Termination

 

Session 1 Vehicular Rescue Involving Animals

SPO 1-1 The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of the various techniques used to rescue that is entrapped as the result of a motor vehicle accident.

EO 1-1 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques involves in assessing the scene of a vehicle accident where equipment used to transport animals may be involved.

EO 1-2 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques involves in controlling hazards at the scene of a vehicle accident where equipment used to transport animals may be involved.

EO 1-3 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the support operations that may be required at the scene of a vehicle accident where equipment used to transport animals may be involved.

EO 1-4 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques and equipment that may be used to gain access to transport animals may be involved.

EO 1-5 Demonstrate a basic understanding of any emergency care procedures that may be required or taken at the scene of a vehicle accident where equipment used to transport animals may be involved.

EO 1-6 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques and equipment that may be used to disentangle animals trapped in equipment used to transport animals.

EO 1-7 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques and equipment that may be used to remove and transfer animals rescued from equipment used to transport animals.

EO 1-8 Demonstrate a basic understanding of the techniques that may be used to terminate and accident where equipment used to transport animals was involved.

NOTE: This program is designed to provide fire and rescue response personnel with some basic information to assist them in dealing with a vehicular accident where animals may be involved. The outline, which focuses on the animal portion of the rescue, follows the phases of extrication, where applicable, and is based on basic vehicle rescue techniques. The animals involved could include live stock such as cattle, pigs and hogs, or sheep, or more domesticated animals such as horses, with some animals being heavier than others. It is strongly recommended that rescue personnel seek the assistance of individuals knowledgeable in the care and handling of the animals involved. Remember that the animals may be a source of income or have a personal attachment to the owner.

In order to make the program more meaningful, it is suggested that someone familiar with the group of animals being discussed assist with the presentation. This could include a veterinarian, an animal owner/breeder, or an organization specializing in the rescue of animals. Having the animal transport vehicles on hand to review would also be helpful. Participants in this program should have some form of vehicle extrication training such as Rescue Technician offered by the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute or an equivalent program.

 

I. Assessment (1-1)

A. Dispatch Information

  1. What

  2. Where

  3. What is involved

  4. Time of day

B. Pre-Incident Planning

  1. Known locations

  2. Known hazards

C. Scene Size-Up

  1. Confirm dispatch information

  2. What is involved - people and animals

  3. Can the incident be handled with current resources

  4. Are specialized resources needed

  5. What hazards are present

  6. How can rescue be performed without moving vehicle

D. Scene Safety

  1. Safety of rescue personnel

  2. Safety of the public

  3. Safety of the animals

 

II. Hazard Control (1-2)

A. Utilities

  1. Downed or impinged wires

  2. Damaged poles

  3. Energized wires

B. Fire or fire potential

  1. Extra fuel in animal container - hay carried in front portion of trailer

  2. Location of fire

  3. Prevent ignition

C. Vehicle Stability

D. Animal Stability

E. Smoke and Odors - can affect how the animal reacts

 

III. Support Operations (1-3)

A. Scene Control

  1. Crowd control

  2. Personnel accountability

  3. ICS

B. Lighting

  1. General scene lighting

  2. Work area lighting

C. Control and Containment of Animals

  1. Equipment needed

  2. Personnel needed

  3. Means of control and containment

D. Technical Assistance

  1. Animal owners/breeders

  2. Animal transporters

  3. Veterinarians

  4. Animal rescue organizations – local organization or animal control authorities

E. Specialized Equipment

  1. Trailers

  2. Harnesses and bridles

  3. Slings

  4. Rope

 

IV. Gaining Access (1-4)

A. Stabilize Vehicle

  1. Trailer

      a. Identify contact points for stabilizing

      b. Stabilize towing vehicle and trailer

      c. Use normal stabilizing equipment and techniques

      d. May require stabilizing within vehicle to minimize movement of partitions or collapse of container

      e. Monitor shifting of load

  2. Self-Contained Unit

      a. Identify contact points for stabilizing

      b. Stabilize unit

      c. Use normal stabilizing equipment and techniques

      d. May require stabilizing within vehicle to minimize movement of partitions or collapse of container

      e. Monitor shifting of load

B. Use Normal Means

      a. Front, side, or rear doors or ramps

      b. Windows

C. Avoid Injury to Animals

      a. Use tools that produce least noise and vibration

      b. Note location of animals to avoid injury

D. Calm Animals

      a. Animals may be affected by noise and gasoline odors

      b. Use cotton in pieces of nylon stocking to fabricate ear plugs

      c. May require application of odorant such as Vicks to nostrils to minimize odor of gasoline

      d. Utilize personnel knowledgeable with animals to assist

      e. Animals can react violently (bite, kick, scratch) due to constraint, possible injury, and effort to

          become free

E. Confirm Assessment

      a. Number of animals involved

      b. Condition of animals

      c. Location and position of animals – may require rescue in a certain order

      d. Obstacles or obstructions to rescue

 

V. Emergency Care (1-5)

A. Consider People and Animals

B. May Require Specialized Care Including Administration of Sedatives

C. Rescue, Euthanasia, or Recovery

 

VI. Disentanglement (1-6)

A. May Require Interior Stabilization

  1. Interior partitions

  2. Multiple levels

  3. Exterior covering

  4. Openings - doors and ramps

B. Determine Order of Removal

  1. Multiple animals

  2. Location of animals

  3. Path of removal

  4. May require assistance to determine rescue and save potential

C. Make Sufficient Size Opening

  1. Plan openings for removal

  2. Note position of animals

  3. Minimize actions such as unnecessary noise and vehicle movement that would upset animals

D. Plan Operation

  1. Avoid damaging structural supports

      a. Look for rivet lines

      b. Tap on metal to identify structural supports

  2. Avoid harm to animals

  3. Consider using existing openings, even if enlarging required

  4. Use roof flap if vehicle on side

  5. Use side wall flap if vehicle upright and existing openings not useable

E. Select Tools Carefully (avoid unnecessary noise and vehicle movement)

  1. Electrically powered hydraulic tools

  2. Reciprocating saws with lubricant

  3. May be able to remove doors with hand tools

 

VII. Removal and Transfer (1-7)

A. Should Be Addressed During Disentanglement

  1. Select removal path

  2. Identify removal equipment

  3. Protect animals during removal (sharp edges)

  4. Rescue personnel should assist/support animal rescue personnel

B. Tail-Tie Removal

  1. Can be used for horse removal

  2. Tail will support full weight of horse if pull is steady rather than sudden

  3. Involves placing rope midway on horse's tail, forming a bight in the tail, wrapping rope around tail,

      and pulling rope back through round turn (becket bend with tail being used in place of one of the

      two ropes being joined together)

  4. Consider tying know from side of horse to avoid being kicked

  5. Only useable when horse is being removed to rear

C. Full Body Slide

  1. Used when horse being removed sideways

  2. Involves starting at right front leg, passing the rope under the right front leg toward the rear, under

      the right rear leg, under the left rear leg leaving some slack in the rope between the two rear legs,

      and under the left front leg

  3. Form a loop in the standing end of the rope with the standing end on the bottom of the loop, pull

      the slack rope at the rear up to form a bight at the hind end of the horse top of the loop, lay the

      bight on the loop in the standing end of the rope, take the running end through the loop in the

      standing end, around the standing end, and back through the loop. The completed knot, which

      should look similar to a Bowline, is a French Bowline (figure 1).

  4. Knot is designed to equalize as animal is moved and to use extremities for support

  5. Rope should not be placed around animal's neck or chest

  6. May want to use rope and sling to pull animal onto animal sling

D. Animal Packaging Requirements

  1. Consult with individuals knowledgeable with animals involved

  2. At a minimum, animal should be placed on pieces of plywood, blankets, or salvage covers that can

      be used for further movement

E. Special Transport Requirements

  1. Need should be identified and units request early into incident

  2. May involve trailers or specialized animal transport units

  3. Beyond scope of fire department

 

VIII. Termination (1-8)

A. Size Debris Clean-up

B. Animal Removal (deceased)

C. Return to Normal

D. Stress Concerns - May Require Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Assistance

A videotape entitled "The Equine Trailer Rescue" is available to assist with the training activities. It can be obtained from Video Knowledge, 25 Applegate Street, Red Bank, NJ 07701.

Other Sources of Information:

   • www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ceh

   • www.feltonfire.com

   • Days End Farm, 15856 Frederick Road, P.O. Box 309, Lisbon, MD 21765, 301-854-5037

   • You may want to obtain animal transport vehicles to practice extrication techniques. This will give

      the students hands-on experience with available tools and techniques. A source might be

      racetracks.

 

SUMMARY:

Review:

Vehicular Rescue Involving Animals

   • Assessment

   • Hazard Control

   • Support Operations

   • Gaining Access

   • Emergency Care

   • Disentanglement

   • Removal and Transfer

   • Termination

 

Remotivation:

A motor vehicle incident where animals may be involved is something that any fire or rescue department has the potential of being dispatched to. Being prepared prior to the incident will produce a more positive outcome and better public relations for the department. An incident such as this should be handled in a professional manner and not be utilize as a training opportunity.

 

 

 

 

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