Engineering Roundtable

In November 2005, Firehouse® Magazine asked fire apparatus manufacturers to join a roundtable addressing the important issue of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2007 vehicle emissions standards. As a follow-up, we recently asked...


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In November 2005, Firehouse® Magazine asked fire apparatus manufacturers to join a roundtable addressing the important issue of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2007 vehicle emissions standards. As a follow-up, we recently asked apparatus, chassis and engine manufacturers to address specific issues centering on engine construction, chassis and cab modifications, fuel consumption and other performance issues, and availability of replacement parts for pre-2007 engines. We thank the companies that participated in this roundtable and invite all apparatus and component manufacturers to participate in upcoming exchanges of important information.

AMERICAN LAFRANCE
Doug Kelley
Corporate Sales Coordinator - American LaFrance

Firehouse: With the development of new engines to meet the 2007 federal emissions standards, will their size remain the same or will they require more or less room on the chassis?

Kelley: These answers were developed after consultation with Steve Reed, American LaFrance’s chassis engineering manager.

EPA2007 will cause the engine size to increase. The block sizes will remain the same, but the additional heat-rejection requirement to meet the stringent EPA2007 mandate will cause parts of the air intake, exhaust and cooling systems on the engine to change. For example, turbochargers are changing and, for the most part, getting larger. Therefore, in total, an EPA2007 engine will take up more room than its counterpart engine today.

Firehouse: Please describe any anticipated changes in horsepower, fuel consumption, exhaust or other performance factors. Also, are there any new benefits or problems that fire apparatus buyers should be aware of?

Kelley: EPA2007 engines will get slightly heavier due to added components. Performance changes will depend on the specific engine. Almost all of the horsepower/torque ratings that the customers are used to today will be carried over, and there will also be some additional ones introduced. However, the engine manufacturers are changing their power and torque curves. This may mean a slight degradation in certain operating conditions, again depending on the engine. This will also change fuel consumption rate. Exhaust, however, will be much cleaner, with an almost total elimination of soot.

The main benefit to the user is the elimination of “blue-smoke†issues that many departments complain about. Conversely, there will be a cost penalty for the new engines, after-treatment devices, cab redesigns, cooling package upgrades and electrical system changes required to meet EPA2007 certification.

Firehouse: How long after the changeover to new engines will parts be available for existing engines?

Kelley: Engine manufacturers should have parts available for service at the onset of EPA2007 engine introduction. Parts for existing engines will continue to be available for the foreseeable future. Cummins


Cyndi Nigh
Manager/On-Highway Communications - Cummins Inc.

Firehouse: With the development of new engines to meet the 2007 federal emissions standards, will their size remain the same or will they require more or less room on the chassis?

Nigh: In 2007, Cummins will continue to offer a full range of engines for the fire and emergency vehicle market from the ISB, ISC, ISL to the ISM and ISX. In 2007, Cummins will use a common emissions reduction approach – proven cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), an integrated Cummins Particulate Filter, Variable Geometry Turbo (VGT) and crankcase ventilation – across all automotive engines. We will add cooled EGR to the ISC and ISL models. The engine envelope will increase slightly in 2007 over today’s product due to necessary hardware.

Firehouse: Please describe any anticipated changes in horsepower, fuel consumption, exhaust or other performance factors. Also, are there any new benefits or problems that fire apparatus buyers should be aware of?

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