Back To Basics: Advancing Attack Lines

TOPIC: BACK TO BASICS: ADVANCING ATTACK LINES TIME REQUIRED: THREE HOURS MATERIALS: TWO FULLY EQUIPPED PUMPER, STRUCTURE FOR USE IN ADVANCING HOSE REFERENCES: ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING, FOURTH EDITION, IFSTA, CHAPTERS 12 AND 13 AND...


            b. Advance a charged 2-1/2-inch line up a ladder to a floor above the ground floor

  G. Standpipe Operations

      1. Beginning attack operations

            a. Pull excess hose up stairway toward next floor before charging

            b. Be careful not to impede evacuation or allow great volumes of smoke in stairway

      2. Fire department siamese

            a. Water should be pumped into any standpipe system being used for firefighting

            b. At least two lines should be connected

                  1) First line to left intake and charged

                  2) Second line to right intake

            c. If supply line cannot be connected to siamese, water can be supplied to system through

                outlet on first floor

            d. Pumper should be positioned within 50 feet

       3. Practical

            a. Set up and establish a water supply from the attack pumper to a fire protective system using

                multiple lines of 2-1/2-inch or 3-inch hose

            b. Advance an uncharged 1-1/2-inch, 1-3/4-inch, or 2-inch line to the floor below the fire

               floor, connect it to the standpipe connection, charge it, and advance it to the fire floor

            c. After the line is charged, extend the line to a higher floor using an extra section of hose (may

                require the use of a breakaway nozzle)

 

III. FIRE ATTACK (1-3)

  A. Initial Attack

      1. Direct attack

           a. Used for smaller fires or lower heat levels in the room

           b. Water is applied directly to fire rather than area above fire

           c. Narrow fog or straight stream used

           d. Produces less steam which is beneficial where a victim may be involved

      2. Indirect attack - fog stream used to attack fire from outside building

           a. Should not be used to fight fire in occupied building

           b. Quick interior attack should not be made in building undergoing demolition, abandoned, had

                previous fires or under construction

           c. If large intense fire encountered, may be necessary to knock down or control fire from

              outside using solid stream before making interior attack

       3. Combination attack

            a. Used when entire area has high heat level

            b. Consists of applying water to fire and area above fire

            c. Pattern includes the T, Z, and O

        4. Number of lines

            a. Attack main body of fire

            b. Get over fire

            c. On each side of fire

            d. Consideration must be given to mobility of hose and flow requirements

  B. Solid Stream Versus Fog Stream

       1. For safest and most effective operation where people in area, solid stream or fog nozzle on

           straight stream position should be used

             a. Aid rescue

             b. Reduce steam production

       2. Use of fog should be restricted to unoccupied confined spaces

       3. When building adequately ventilated opposite direction from fog nozzle, fog stream can be used

             a. No more than 30-degree angle

             b. Produces reach and fog pattern

  C. Effective Stream Operation

        1. Use solid stream nozzles or set fog nozzles on straight stream setting

        2. Stay low upon entering fire area to let heat and gases vent before moving in

        3. Before door to fire area opened, all firefighters should be positioned on same side of entrance

            and remain low

        4. Crack nozzle and bleed air out of line ahead of water

        5. If fire shows at top of door as opened, ceiling should be hit with solid or straight stream to cool