Back To Basics: Effective Forcible Entry

TOPIC: BACK TO BASICS: EFFECTIVE FORCIBLE ENTRY TIME REQUIRED: THREE HOURS MATERIALS: ASSORTMENT OF HAND TOOLS AND POWER SAWS, ACQUIRED STRUCTURE OR FORCIBLE ENTRY PROPS, REFERENCES: ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING, FOURTH EDITION, IFSTA...


      b. First step in forcing metal doors to pry it up at both sides

      c. Some, usually wood, locked with modified two-piece lock - open by knocking out panel and

          reaching in to rotate handle

      d. Wood door might be secured with pins from sides of door to track - door should be pried at

          bottom

      e. Ring on door may be padlocked to ring set into floor - force with tool under door against ring

      f. Doors can be cut with power saw or axe

      g. Metal doors do not usually have built-in locks - can be padlocked to floor or locked into their

          rails

      h. Motorized door rigidly connected to operating mechanism; break glass or panel and activate

          emergency door release mechanism

      i. Force doors locked with pins or through chain by prying

      j. Manually operated commercial doors often locked through raising chain

      k. If commercial metal door must be opened, cut door in center of door with power saw and

          remove slats

E. Occupancies

  1. Commercial

       a. Look for door that property owner uses to exit since it will be the easiest to force

       b. In older buildings, front door might be constructed of wood or wood frame with ordinary glass

       c. In modern structures, front door made of tempered glass or heavy plate glass in strong frame

       d. Rear doors usually made of steel or reinforced with steel

       e. Front door protected by metal shutters, accordion-type barred grating, or similar devices

       f. May have multiple locks

  2. Residential

      a. Locked residential structures more easily entered than commercial structures

      b. Front and rear doors usually same type and of light construction

      c. Often have one or more glass panes

  3. Apartments

      a. Might have to open individual doors

      b. In older buildings, doors made of wood - rim locks may have been added

      c. Frames of doors usually strong enough to support pry tool

      d. In modern buildings, doors made of steel or wood covered with steel - secured with cylinder

          locks and possibly one or more bolt-type locks

      e. Multiple-unit street doors at front often unlocked

      f. Lobby door may be secured by electric lock

      g. May have multiple locks

      h. May be necessary to force entry through the wall near the door to reach in to unlock the door

  4. Office buildings

      a. Presents same problems as apartment units

      b. Age of building determines type of inside office door, unless remodeled extensively

      c. Most buildings open to street during day

      d. Outside entrances usually similar to those found in stores of same general age

  5. Warehouses and factories

      a. Usually have roll-up doors at loading platforms and heavy wooden or steel pedestrian doors

      b. Windows on lower floors may be barred

      c. Usually surrounded by chain-link fences - may require forcing padlock

      d. Some occupancies protected at night by guard dogs

  6. Combination occupancies - may present double entry problem with forcing first into building and

      then into individual units

II. ENTRY THROUGH WINDOWS (1-2)

A. Double-hung windows

  1. Allows simplest and quickest access to building

      a. Forced by prying up bottom section at center of window

      b. If top section made of small panes, pane nearest lock can be removed and window unlocked

  2. If it must be used for entry and cannot be forced quickly, it should be completed knocked out

      a. If at ground level, use axe or other appropriate tool

      b. Above ground situations may be not be discovered until window is reached

      c. Remove all splinters of glass before going through

      d. Standard single pane glass may be replaced with thermal panes which are two panes with an air

          space in the middle for insulation