Back To Basics: Effective Forcible Entry

TOPIC: BACK TO BASICS: EFFECTIVE FORCIBLE ENTRY TIME REQUIRED: THREE HOURS MATERIALS: ASSORTMENT OF HAND TOOLS AND POWER SAWS, ACQUIRED STRUCTURE OR FORCIBLE ENTRY PROPS, REFERENCES: ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING, FOURTH EDITION, IFSTA...


      b. Metal could be fastened directly to structural supports or have some type of insulation board

          behind it

      c. Framing is 16 or 24 inches on center; framing could be metal

      d. Siding could be covering other materials such as wood

      e. Siding can be cut with conventional cutting tools or power saws

      f. Sheet metal covering can be cut with power saws or air chisel

      g. Material may be removed by separating at the seams

  3. Masonry

      a. Exterior walls could be concrete, brick, block, or stone

      b. May be veneer attached to wood or metal frame or solid masonry (look for header rows every

          seven rows on brick walls)

      c. Brick, block, and stone held together by mortar joints which are the weakest point in the wall

      d. Sometimes quicker to open wall than force steel door, especially concrete block or cinder block

          walls

      e. Use mauls, battering rams, and hammerhead picks to make openings

      f. Make opening in diamond or triangle sharp to avoid wall collapse

      g. Identify a key brick or block as the starting point and push everything else towards it

      h. Block walls can be cut with power saws

      i. If possible, open wall near doorway

      j. At first, make opening only large enough to permit stream to be directed inside

      k. Make sure blocks or bricks over opening are firmly in place

  4. Plaster

      a. Plasters affixed to walls using lathe strips or mesh

      b. Walls fastened to framing 16 or 24 inches on center

      c. Plaster can be cut with conventional cutting tools such as an axe or pulled using a pulling tool

      d. Cutting or pulling should be done close to framing to reduce bouncing

  5. Drywall

      a. Drywall generally in 4 foot by 8 or 10 foot sheets, 3/8- or ½-inch thick

      b. Drywall fastened to framing 16 or 24 inches on center

      c. Drywall can be cut with conventional cutting tools such as an axe or pulled using a pulling tool

      d. Cutting or pulling should be done close to framing to reduce bouncing

B. Ceilings

  1. Plaster

      a. Plasters affixed to ceiling using lathe strips or mesh

      b. Ceilings fastened to framing 16 or 24 inches on center

      c. Plaster can be pulled using a pulling tool

      d. Pulling should start at the room entrance and be done close to framing to reduce bouncing

  2. Drywall

      a. Drywall generally in 4 foot by 8 or 10 foot sheets, 3/8- or ½-inch thick

      b. Drywall fastened to framing 16 or 24 inches on center

      c. Drywall can be pulled using a pulling tool

      d. Pulling should start at the room entrance and be done close to framing to reduce bouncing

      e. Drywall may be used during building renovation to cover other materials such as plaster

  3. Acoustic tile

      a. Can be in metal strips or fastened to the ceiling using furring strips

      b. Tile in metal strips can be lifted for removal

      c. Tile fastened to the ceiling can be pull for access using pulling tools

      d. Tile may be used to cover other materials such as plaster

      e. There may be space between the tile ceiling and the original ceiling in a building

      f. Tile removal should start at the room entrance

      g. Metal strips are supported by aluminum wire which has little heat resistance

  4. Metal

      a. Metal in ceiling use is generally tin found in older structures

      b. Ceiling material may be pulled using pulling tools

      c. Pulling should start at room entrance

      d. There may be some type of material behind the tin

  5. Masonry

      a. Masonry ceilings are either pre-cast or poured concrete

      b. If masonry ceilings are encountered, look for penetrations since making openings in masonry

          ceilings is very time consuming

       c. There should be little or no need to force entry through a masonry ceiling

C. Floors

  1. Wood