Are You Putting Enough Wet Stuff On The Red Stuff?

TOPIC: ARE YOU PUTTING ENOUGH WET STUFF ON THE RED STUFF? TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS REFERENCES: ENGINE COMPANY FIREGROUND OPERATIONS, SECOND EDITION, NFPA; ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING, FOURTH...


             opening or path of heat and steam

           r. Consider venting the fire area just prior to initiating the fire attack to provide a path for heat

              and steam to exit

      4. Number of lines

           a. Attack main body of fire

           b. Get over the fire (this may need to be done before the attack on the main body of fire to

              reduce the potential for extension)

           c. On each side of the fire

          d. Consideration must be given to mobility of hose and flow requirements

  B. Back-Up Lines

       1. Purpose of back-up lines

           a. Used when the initial attack lines cannot quickly control the fire

           b. Not used to protect exposures or attack the fire

           c. Held in readiness for use in place of the attack lines

      2. Stretched whenever it is not completely obvious that the fire can quickly be extinguished with the

          initial attack lines

            a. Taken into the building immediately after initial attack lines

            b. Positioned close to the initial attack lines

            c. Charged and ready for use

       3. Size of back-up lines

             a. For 1-1/2-inch lines, minimum 1-3/4-inch

             b. For 1-3/4-inch lines, minimum 2-1/2-inch

             c. For 2-1/2-inch lines, minimum 2-1/2-inch with larger tip

             d. For fire where the initial attack is a 2-1/2-inch line, master stream devices may be required

       4. If back-up lines are placed in service, the initial attack lines should be shut down

       5. Once the fire is controlled, back-up lines should be shut down and a smaller line used for mop

           up

  C. Hose line selection

        1. Engine companies must be considerate of limitations of various sizes of hose

        2. In addition to flow limitations, there is factor known as friction loss which affects fire flows

              a. Loss of pressure within hose line due to internal resistance of water against hose lining

              b. Friction loss affected by three factors

                    1) Flow

                    2) Hose length

                    3) Size of hose

               c. Should be consideration for engine company crew when selecting attack lines which must

                   be stretched over long distances

        3. Maximum flow capabilities for attack lines

                   1-1/2-inch 125 GPM

                   1-3/4-inch 150 GPM

                   2-inch 200 GPM

                   2-1/2-inch 250 GPM

                   3-inch 400 GPM

         4. Range of nozzle flows for combination nozzles with recommended nozzle pressure of 100 PSI

                   1-1/2-inch 30 GPM to 125 GPM

                   1-3/4-inch 95 GPM to 150 GPM

                   1-3/4-inch/2-inch 95 GPM to 200 GPM

                    2-1/2-inch 125 GPM to 250 GPM

          5. Flows for a 2-1/2-inch solid tip nozzle with recommended nozzle pressure of 50 PSI

                    1-inch tip 210 GPM

                    1-1/8-inch tip 266 GPM

                    1-1/4-inch tip 328 GPM

          6. Flows from master stream devices

               a. Fog nozzle minimum is 500 GPM at 100 PSI nozzle pressure

               b. Flows for straight tips with recommended nozzle pressure of 80 PSI (rounded)

                    1-1/2-inch 600 GPM

                    1-5/8-inch 700 GPM

                    1-3/4-inch 800 GPM