Are You Putting Enough Wet Stuff On The Red Stuff?

TOPIC: ARE YOU PUTTING ENOUGH WET STUFF ON THE RED STUFF? TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS REFERENCES: ENGINE COMPANY FIREGROUND OPERATIONS, SECOND EDITION, NFPA; ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING, FOURTH...


                    1-7/8-inch 900 GPM

                    2-inch 1000 GPM

           7. Friction loss for attack lines

               a. For 1-1/2-inch, 1-3/4-inch, and 2-inch attack lines, 30 PSI per hundred feet

               b. For 2-1/2-inch attack lines, 15 PSI per hundred feet

               c. 1-1/2-inch, 1-3/4-inch, and 2-inch attack lines should not exceed 300 feet in length

               d. 2-1/2-inch attack lines should not exceed 500 feet

               e. When lengths of attack line beyond those recommended are required, consideration

                   should be given to using 3-inch, 4-inch, or 5-inch hose to get water closer to the fire scene

                   and dividing the flow into more manageable size attack lines using wyes or manifolds

                   (leader line)

         8. Select hoselines and flow rates that use a much greater flow than needed

             a. Nozzle pressure may be insufficient to flow the required flow rate

             b. Fire may be larger than anticipated

             c. Fire can be extinguished quicker thereby reducing damage

            d. Do not rely on the maneuverability and convenience of smaller lines and flows when larger

                flows are needed

        9. Points to consider

             a. Unless you are using a flow meter you cannot be certain that the nozzle is flowing what you

                 expect.

             b. Insufficient flow in relation to the heat production can cause injury or death to firefighters.

             c. The previous examples are based on a room and contents fire in a residence. Unless you

                 are certain of how much or what is involved, plan beyond the initial attack.

             d. The previous examples are based on darkening the fire and all the water converting to 

                 steam. This is not realistic so plan beyond that.

             e. Do not be afraid to deploy larger attack lines because the standard line used in a 1-3/4-inch

                which may be inadequate fro the situation.

If you have flow meters available, you may want to go out and test the flows of the nozzles used in your department to make sure that they are flowing what you expect based on the friction loss calculations and nozzle being used. It may be found that they are not producing what is expected which presents a safety concern for individuals on the attack line in a fire situation.

 

REVIEW:

ARE YOU PUTTING ENOUGH WET STUFF ON THE RED STUFF?

   * Fuel Loading

   * Fire Flow Requirements

   * Handlines and Master Streams

REMOTIVATION: Remember, any fire will eventually go out but going to larger hoselines and flows initially will make that happen quicker with less structural damage and create a safer work environment.