Understanding The 2004 Emegency Response Guide

TOPIC: UNDERSTANDING THE 2004 EMEGENCY RESPONSE GUIDE TIME REQUIRED: TWO HOURS MATERIALS: APPROPRIATE AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS, 2004 EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK REFERENCES: 2004 EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK, U.S DEPARTMENTOF TRANSPORTATION...


      j. Guides 145 to 148 – organic peroxides (no guide 147)

      k. Guides 149 to 150 – substances-self-reactive

      l. Guides 151 to 157 – substances-toxic

      m. Guide 158 – infectious substances

      n. Guide 159 – substances-irritating

      o. Guide 160 – halogenated solvents

      p. Guides 161 to 166 – radioactive materials

      q. Guide 167 – fluorine

      r. Guide 168 – carbon monoxide

      s. Guide 169 – aluminum-molten

      t. Guide 170 – metals

      u. Guide 171 – substances-low to moderate hazard

      v. Guide 172 – gallium and mercury

  2. Guide Page Sections

      a. Potential hazards

         1) Fire or explosion

         2) Health

         3) Most serious listed first in section

      b. Public safety

        1) General information

        2) Protective clothing (read the entire section before taking action; clothing requirements may be

           different for spill or fire)

        3) Evacuation (if not highlighted in numeric or alphabetic lists)

      c. Emergency response

       1) Fire (may identify special agents needed)

       2) Spill or leak

       3) First aid

C. SPECIAL SECTIONS (EO 1-3)

  1. Table of Placards (pages 16 and 17)

      a. Use only when the ID number (four digit) is not visible

      b. Refer to the guide number (three digit) adjacent to the placard

      c. Attempt to safely obtain more specific information about the product(s)

  2. Rail Car Identification Chart (page 18)

      a. Use when placard is not visible

      b. Refer to guide number adjacent to silhouette

      c. Attempt to safely obtain more specific information about the product(s)

  3. Road Trailer Identification Chart (page 19)

      a. Use when placard is not visible

      b. Refer to guide number adjacent to silhouette

      c. Attempt to safely obtain more specific information about the product(s)

  4. Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances (pages 302 to 343)

      a. Know the ID number and name of the material (table arranged by ID number rather than name)

      b. Note the wind direction

      c. Determine if it is a small spill or large spill (single small package, small cylinder, or small leak in

         large package for small spill)

      d. Determine if it is day (between sunrise and sunset) or night

      e. Determine initial isolation distance (distance in all directions from center of release)

      f. Determine protective action distance (distance downwind from center of release; width is half of

        distance)

      g. Consider public safety when determining size of spill and take a conservation approach

  5. Chemical/Biological/Radiological Agents (pages 354 to 357)

      a. Differences between chemical, biological, and radiological agents

      b. Indicators of possible chemical incident

      c. Indicators of possible biological incident

      d. Indicators of possible radiological incident

      e. Personal safety considerations

D. GUIDEBOOK USE (EO 1-4)

  1. Look up ID number 1993, find name of product and guide number, go to guide page, and read fire

      or explosion information (Note that there is more than one product with the same ID number)

  2. Look up Sarin, find ID number and guide number, go to guide page, read health and protective

      clothing information, go to table of initial isolation and protective action distances, and read

      information for small spill during the day (note that there are several distances for the same product)

  3. Look up the guide page when the only information known is that the placard is blue

  4. Look up the guide page when the only information known is that the trailer is round with rib

      supports

  5. You respond on an alarm for a person that is not feeling well. Upon arrival at the scene and during