Keeping the Promise: The Fireman’s Fund Re-ignited

You never know where a simple telephone call may lead. In February 2004, I received a very interesting and, at the time, somewhat vague call. As I answered the telephone with my official title and “business voice,” the gentleman on the other end...


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You never know where a simple telephone call may lead. In February 2004, I received a very interesting and, at the time, somewhat vague call. As I answered the telephone with my official title and “business voice,” the gentleman on the other end introduced himself. The opening few minutes of the call went something like this: “I am Darryl Siry of the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co. and I would like to set up an appointment to meet with you, Chief. We are establishing a benevolent program entitled Heritage Fund, whereby we will be making sizeable donations to fire service agencies across America.”

Not wanting to miss an opportunity, but being very skeptical about the sincerity and true value of such an open-ended offer, I agreed to meet with him and one of his colleagues. Boy, what a marvelous surprise was in store for the American fire-rescue service that will continue to provide mission-critical resources for many, many years. The Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program delivered big in its first year and promises even more support to our agencies in years to come.

Fireman’s Fund was founded in 1863 in San Francisco with a mission to pay 10% of its profits to widows and orphans of firefighters. At that time, catastrophic fires were commonplace. In the wake of such devastating fires, there was financial loss of huge proportions. It was the era when “fire marks” were displayed on insured buildings to provide a monetary incentive for local fire companies to work a little harder to put the fires out quickly in order to limit the damage.

During these all-out firefights, it was not uncommon for members to lose life and limb while protecting lives and property. Sounds like today, but there were no controls such as the incident management system or rapid intervention teams to protect our forefathers. Once they were killed or injured, there was little or no support offered to the surviving family members. In a true effort to provide for the care and support of firefighters’ families, Fireman’s Fund Insurance established a trust fund (perhaps the very first one) to help with the financial burden of a line-of-duty death or injury of a firefighter.

As time marches on, change is inevitable. Fireman’s Fund moved away from its original promise to help firefighters. With programs like Social Security and the Public Safety Officers Death Benefit, it was easy for the company to lose sight of its pledge to help us. To emphasize the different direction that the company had taken by the 1980s, Firemen’s Fund sponsored the Major League Baseball “Relief Pitcher of the Year” award. It was quite a nice award for the American League and National League relievers who posted the best “save” records. The trophy was a silver Cairns “Senator” replica helmet atop a wooden stand; very nice, but of no help to America’s true heroes, the fire-rescue service.

The company reorganized a few years ago, identifying and hiring an entirely new executive team. At the “helm” is a true friend of the fire service, Chuck Kavitsky, the CEO. The “turnaround” team quickly realized that the promise that the company was founded upon must be upheld. Another reason why Fireman’s Fund has restated its commitment to the fire-rescue service is the background of the chief operating officer, Joe Beneducci. He is the son of a New York City firefighter. When you talk to Joe, he will quickly tell you about his dad and the days he spent growing up in the local firehouse. When I think about my friend Joe, I associate the two Fireman’s Fund mottoes – “Play to Win” and “Honor the Promise.”

The Fireman’s Fund Heritage Program was launched in the spring of 2004. Three major cities were identified to breathe life into and be the test sites for this effort. Of the three cities, metro Atlanta was selected as the recipient area; hence, my meeting with Darryl Siry. He asked me to identify significant additional or specialized equipment that Atlanta Fire-Rescue might need. The only difficulty with fulfilling his request was prioritizing our tremendous needs.

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