Veteran Dallas Firefighter Faces 9 Sex-Crime Counts

A veteran Dallas firefighter was arrested Monday on a nine-count Johnson County indictment alleging that he sexually assaulted the teen-age daughter of an acquaintance last year.


A veteran Dallas firefighter was arrested Monday on a nine-count Johnson County indictment alleging that he sexually assaulted the teen-age daughter of an acquaintance last year.

Danny Wayne Grammer was released from jail Tuesday after posting $100,000 bail on three charges of aggravated sexual assault and six counts of indecency with a child, said sheriff's spokeswoman Cpl. Pam Jetsel.

Grammer, 50, of Cleburne, could not be reached to comment. But his attorney, Dick Turner, said Wednesday that Grammer "strongly denies" the girl's allegations.

"My client has never been in trouble a day in his life," Turner said. "He has a great job and a family. His reputation is impeccable." The March 3 indictment alleges that the girl was younger than 14 when Grammer had sexual intercourse with her on or about March 13, June 19 and Oct. 16. The girl's age elevates the charge to a first-degree felony with a maximum life prison sentence. Grammer also was indicted on six counts of indecency by contact with a child under 17, a second-degree felony with a maximum 20-year prison term. He is accused of touching the girl's genitals and her breast and causing her to touch his genitals on Feb. 14, 2004, and Oct. 16.

Sheriff Bob Alford said his officers launched an investigation in mid-December after the girl, now 14, reported the ongoing assaults to someone at her school.

Turner contended that the girl's allegations were motivated by a rift between her family and Grammer's family, who were neighbors in an unincorporated area southeast of Cleburne.

"At the proper time, we will bring out motives as to why this mess was alleged," Turner said.

Grammer has been on paid administrative leave from Dallas Fire-Rescue since department officials learned of the allegations last month, spokesman Lt. Joel Lavender said.

Lavender said Grammer's future with the department, where he has worked since September 1985, depends on the outcome of an internal investigation independent of his criminal proceedings.

"Even though these allegations are serious, he's still innocent until proven guilty," Lavender said.

Staff Writer Bill Miller Contributed to This Report.