Toledo Firefighters Killed at Building Fire

Firefighters Stephen A. Machcinski, 42, and James Dickman, 31, became disoriented in the blaze


Toledo firefighters were mourning the loss of two of their own Sunday afternoon.

Firefighters Stephen A. Machcinski, 42, and James Dickman, 31, were reportedly in cardiac arrest when they were brought out of the building. 

Machcinski was appointed in 1998 and assigned to Engine No. 3, and Dickman on Sept. 3, 2013.

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They called a 'Mayday' after becoming disoriented, officials told the local media.

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About 9:30 p.m., Toledo police officers and firefighters were preparing to escort the bodies of the fallen heroes to the coroner's office.

Dozens of firefighters gathered at their union hall downtown after the tragedy. The room was silent and many in the crowd stood with somber faces drinking coffee while awaiting official news — although all already knew that two of their own had been killed in the line of duty.

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Dan Desmond, Toledo Firefighters Local 92 vice president, said he personally knew the two fallen firefighters but couldn't talk about them.

"Everyone is just numb right now," said Mr. Desmond, a longtime firefighter.

Firefighters and police officers remained at scene of the fatal fire for hours after the blaze. Investigators could be seen moving inside the building. Toledo fire investigator Glen Frames declined to comment on the investigation or the cause of the fire.

As news of the firefighters' deaths circulated, many posted condolences on social media. The Toledo Police Department was among agencies saluting the fallen heroes.

Dr. Maneesha Pandey, a Lucas County deputy coroner, said two firefighter deaths were reported to the office around 6 p.m. Autopsies are scheduled for Monday, The Toledo Blade reported.

A coroner’s investigator is still at the hospital, but did not go to the scene of the fire, she said.

A large contingent of firefighters were joined at Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center by Mayor D. Michael Collins. 

Dozens of firefighters gathered at their union hall downtown after the tragedy. The room was silent and many in the crowd stood with somber faces drinking coffee while awaiting official news — although all already knew that two of their own had been killed in the line of duty, the paper reported.

Dan Desmond, Toledo Firefighters Local 92 vice president, said he personally knew the two fallen firefighters but couldn't talk about them.

"Everyone is just numb right now," Desmond told reporters.

Firefighters and police officers remained at scene of the fatal fire for hours after the blaze.